A Description Of The Immigrants Struggle To Adjust To The American Culture In The 19th Century.

911 words - 4 pages

Immigrant StruggleThe American Expectation and Immigrant ResponseImmigrants often had a difficult and complicated experience when adjusting to life in America. Immigrant families had to find ways to adapt to American society. In some cases immigrants found it necessary to challenge American society. Immigrant ideals were challenged by American values that were pushed on them. Due to these as well as other hardships, immigrants from all walks of life living in America had a genuinely arduous task in adjusting to American life.One of the many hardships immigrants had to overcome was that of appalling living conditions. They did not make enough wages to afford anything remotely close to comfortable living. However, as Jacob Riis states, this does not corrupt immigrants, however it "is a powerful argument for the optimist's belief that the world is, after all, growing better…" Immigrants use their poor living conditions not as an excuse but as a lightning rod for growth and expansion. They use it as a way to better themselves because they started from the bottom and are working their way up. This challenged American ideals because the majority of Americans did not think it was possible for people to cross social or economic boundaries. Americans also especially did not want the immigrant population to do so because Americans did not see immigrants as equals both socially and economically.Along with the poor living conditions, another factor in the economic struggle for immigrants was the lack of steady and livable wages. Often times immigrants were forced to work the most difficult and dangerous jobs while making less than desirable wages. In a private letter written back to a relative in Europe, one immigrant wrote that "if I don't earn $1.50 a day, it would not be worth thinking about America…here in America one must work for three horses." It was a difficult task for an immigrant to earn those types of wages. Stating that one had to work for three horses in America shows that the work they were forced into was backbreaking to the point that it felt like it was the work only three horses could handle properly. All of this culminates to the complete opposite of American ideology. America was supposed to be a land of opportunity and easy money. The immigrants were not included in either of these because they were outsiders in the country.Perhaps the most shocking adaptation to American culture by immigrants was child labor in the 1900's. Since it was rare for a male to make enough money to provide a living for his family, often times women and children were forced into work as well. For children,...

Find Another Essay On A description of the immigrants struggle to adjust to the American culture in the 19th century.

American Capitalist Society In The 19th Century

1463 words - 6 pages Herman Melville’s Utilization of Bartleby the Scrivener: the Story of Wall Street As a Means of Criticizing Capitalism and Its Crimes Against Humanity Herman Melville's "Bartleby, The Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street" scrutinizes the alienation of labor, the social ideologies and the dehumanizing consequences of the American capitalist society in the 19th century. Bartleby is the main character in the story. The other characters

The Struggle of Immigrants in America

1040 words - 5 pages The Struggle of Immigrants in America The U.S has a prolonged history of discrimination. In the late 17th century, when America declared as a free country, only the white gentility had the privileged of “freedom” and African American continue their life as slaves for many decades. As the country grows, it became a dream land, a refuge for immigrations fled from their country to seek freedom and pursuit happiness. However, the gene of

Expansionism in the 19th and early 20th century U.S. was a departure of past American Expansionism

884 words - 4 pages early 1900s was political and humanitarian. Although economic incentive was strong, many economic situations were not profitable for American home economy.Expansionism in the 19th and early 20th century U.S. was a departure of past American Expansionism. Early expansionism was essential for the economic success of America at that time. Expansion in the mid 1800s was important for America and its development of society and national identity. Later expansion during the early 1900s was derivative of political and economic nature, but often turned to military conquest and humanitarian effort.

What drove England to colonize India, in the 19th century ?

1513 words - 6 pages by Joseph Francois Dupleix. Unfortunately, the French lost successively these wars, and put an end to the extension of a French empire in India. It is later, under the administration of Wellesley in the early 19th century the British were conducted the key victories against Indian rivals. The defeats of Sikhs, Marathas, and the Tipu Sultan of Mysore, led the British India Company to control the entirety of India. Having an army, made the British

William Walker, a filibuster of the 19th century in America

1069 words - 4 pages disdain at the filibustering schemes of the French during the 1850s, as the American expansion into Mexico was a factor of Manifest Destiny, to which the French would serve as a grave hindrance.In the mid-nineteenth century, adventurers known as filibusters participated in military actions aimed at obtaining control of Latin American nations with the intent of annexing them to the United States-an expression of Manifest Destiny. Although the movement

India in the late 19th century. To what extent could India be considered a 'nation' in the late 19th to early 20th centuries?

698 words - 3 pages Late nineteenth to early twentieth century India, was directly controlled by Great Britain, and therefore, in name, it was a colony of the British Empire and not a nation of its own. However, India could be described as a nation, as the result of India's ability to be self-governing and self-sufficient and the Indian peoples' desire for self-government, as well as various aspects of Indian culture, such as religion, language, customs, and

How have women's roles changed from the 19th century to the 20th century in Spain?

817 words - 3 pages important impact during the nineteenth and twentiethcentury. Because of this women's roles have changed quite a bit from the early 1800s tothe late 1900s.Spain experienced an economic and political transformation during the SpanishRevolution of the early nineteenth century, 1808 and 1843. Men in Spain were givingbirth to a new gender idea that took down women's participation in the social andpolitical transformations that were taking place. While the

Analysis of Life in the 19th Century

1629 words - 7 pages In the 19th century, at least 80% of the population was working class, to be middle class you had to have at least one servant. In this century, the factory system replaced the system where people were working in their own homes or small workshops. This industry caused children to work a lot more than before. However, this was seasonal and therefore, they also had more time to play. Also women started to work more, for example in the factories

The Motivations of the 19th Century American Anti-chinese Movement

1617 words - 6 pages generated misunderstanding and bias of the Chinese culture. I think maybe the anti-Chinese movement would not have been so fierce if people from the two countries could have a better understanding between each other. Moreover, if China was not that backward in the 19th century, I think the situation of the Chinese immigrants could be much better because it is always true that "it is the weak that subject to humiliation and outrage." Because the Chinese

Women of Australia in the 19th century

806 words - 3 pages . Soon there were more womens that actully did started to come then she really expected. Caroline Cholism really did make a big diffreence in balance of population in Australia in the Mid 19th century.Although Women in the 19th century in Australia was treated as a second class citizens, Which meant that they were not allowed to vote, could not sit in juries, reacived unfair treatment from the law eg, What every money that she owned before marriage

Politics in the 19th Century

1459 words - 6 pages European and American history. Hundreds of names come to mind in the 19th century that developed ideas around socialism, liberalism, and conservatism, however, Fourier, Tocqueville, and Calhoun were the most influential and impactful. There were few commonalities shared between the three men; it was their contrasting attributes that they will be remembered for. Fourier, a utopian socialist, thought things were better off being organized into what he

Similar Essays

The Involvement That The Brothers Grimm Had In Developing The German Nationalism And Social Culture At The Beginning Of The 19th Century

1139 words - 5 pages One of the ideologies that started to emerge in the German states during the early nineteenth century was the concept of nationalism. The idea of being loyal to one country and having a cultural pride that makes ones country better than the others. Two brothers, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, well educated, and respected scholars, helped develop this ideology by gathering folk tales from the different regions in order to help unify Germany and to

The Abolitionist Movement Of Slavery From The Early 19th Century To The American Civil War

1557 words - 7 pages are willing to take action and end the practice of slavery are known as abolitionists. These “anti-slaveryites” took huge risks and went through drastic punishments all to end the very nuisance that flawed America, slavery. Slavery is the practice or system of owning slaves, and slaves are people who are held in servitude and as property. In the early 19th century, the United States established a series of statutes and penal codes which were

The Three Biggest Contributors To American History In The 19th Century

696 words - 3 pages The 19th Century was a period of great advancements in technology, science, culture, and human rights. This age of advancements, known to all as the Industrial Revolution, introduced the world to a flurry of innovations and improvements. Many of these improvements, or contributions were essential to American history. Of the men who made these contributions, three made the greatest, Samuel Morse, Cyrus McCormick, and Benjamin Silliman Born on

Significant Changes In World History From Late 19th Century To The End Of The 20th Century

1618 words - 6 pages represent this transformation,and why?In the period from the late 19th to the end of the 20th century, the world underwent many dramatic changes that impacted every aspect of society. Technological innovations have produced a highly interconnected world. Communication was greatly improved first by the advent of the telephone and recently, the internet. Travel was made exponentially quicker evolving from trains to automobiles and airplanes. These