Analyzing And Comparing The Canterbury Tales

816 words - 3 pages

In the Canterbury Tales , Chaucer reflects his views on society and the values he holds through his representation of his characters in the general prologue and in each of their tales. Chaucer beautifully portrays the values of poverty, chastity, obedience, chivalry and true love. How Chaucer uses the group of people to express and portray the image of what 12th century English society looked like, and how the society was back then .In the Canterbury tales, Chaucer creativity and humorously provides a cross-section of 12th century English society though the group of pilgrims.

In 12th century society people draw straws back then to decide who won and who lost.
“Shortly after the departure day, the pilgrims draw straws” , It obviously shows us how people thought back then, they used sticks instead of coins, or dice compare to modern day society. “The tales are full of secular mirth, sex, and other sins, and the pilgrims themselves are variously drunk” wrote Michelle m Saver. Overall characters of the Canterbury tales represent medieval society and various professions.

“Monk the drunken miller tells story about the carpenter” this shows us how religions figures were corrupt, I’ll be more focusing on how Chaucer said “Monk the Drunken Miller” he is describing monk as drunk, monks are supposed to be respectful and sober, but Chaucer’s description of the monk shows that he doesn't like him and doest now respect him at all , and Poverty was a sworn oath by people of the church that they will not be living rich lives. The Monk does not particularly want to commit to life of poverty, he says “It is not in his nature” , Quote from the book “Ful many a deyntee hors hadde he in stable”, by this Chaucer is saying the Monk owned many lavish and valuable horses, which could not have been purchased with any money he got as being a Monk. But the traditions are being followed since 12th century. 12th century monks were not as much corrupt as modern monks.”Nicolas and young wife Alison, started scheming about how they could have an affair without carpenter finding out.” this shows us how people cheated, and how women cheated, women were not allowed to vote back then, and Alison carpenter’s wife cheated on him, the affair back in 12th century was extremely wild. Nicolas cheated on his best friend , on top of that they are staying in same...

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