Faulkner's A Rose For Emely And Kate Chopin's Story Of An Hour

1479 words - 6 pages

In the stories “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner and “Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin both women suffer through expectations brought on by society and the ideas of marriage. Emily loses her sanity trying to obtain love and live up to the expectations of society. Emily kills the man she loved so that he would never leave, and so that she could maintain her reputation. She was put on a pedestal, and that pedestal would end up being her destruction. Louise is a woman afflicted by heart problems, which could relate her unhappiness. After losing her husband she starts to feel free; however when her husband walks through the door she dies. Louise was a prisoner of societies making, she was never given a voice. She could never explain her unhappiness because women were expected to love and obey their husband’s without complaints. Marriage to these women meant different things, although the idea of marriage damaged both women. Louise and Emily were women damaged by the pressures of who they are expected to be.
Emily was drove crazy by others expectations, and her loneliness. ““A Rose for Emily,” a story of love and obsession, love, and death, is undoubtedly the most famous one among Faulkner’s more than one hundred short stories. It tells of a tragedy of a screwy southern lady Emily Grierson who is driven from stem to stern by the worldly tradition and desires to possess her lover by poisoning him and keeping his corpse in her isolated house.” (Yang, A Road to Destruction and Self Destruction: The Same Fate of Emily and Elly, Proquest) When she was young her father chased away any would be suitors. He was convinced no one was good enough for her. Emily ended up unmarried. She had come to depend on her father. When he finally died, Emily did not want to part with him. She had denied his death for a few days. Finally people from the town were able to remove her father’s body. “We did not say that she was crazy then. We believed she had to do that. We remembered all the young men her father driven away, and we knew that with nothing left, she would have to cling to that which had robbed her, as people will.” (William Faulkner 34) After the death of her father, Emily fell ill. Then she met Homer Barron. He courted her. They would take rides every Sunday morning. Everyone was convinced that they were going to marry. However Homer went around telling everyone he wasn’t the marrying kind and that he enjoyed the company of other men. Homer had bruised Emily’s dignity and reputation. People in the town were in an uproar over her relationship with Homer. She had went out and bought arsenic. She gave no real reason for buying the poison. Again people in the town began to speculate on her situation, telling one another she was sure to kill herself. People wrote out to her family to her family about the terrible example Emily was setting to younger people. “The next Sunday they again drove about the streets, and the following day the minister’s wife wrote to...

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