George Orwell's "1984" (Larger Point In Writing About The Proles.)

1119 words - 4 pages

George Orwell's larger point in writing about the proles position in society in his novel "1984", was to express his view of an unfair hierarchy based on social status and wealth. We the people are the proles in Orwell's mind. The proles oppression and ways in which they are manipulated is Orwell's way of showing us how easily it can happen to us through government regulation. The general theme of "1984" is a political one. Orwell is criticizing a totalitarian government, the kind of government that has absolute control over all aspects of life, including, the intellect and emotions of its citizens. In "1984", Orwell leans toward hope for a better future, one that is not led by a totalitarian government, through having the character Winston, have faith that this hope lies within the proles.In the novel "1984" the proles are considered to be the lower class population. They are the masses. The proles make up 85 % of the population in Oceania. The proles are the common people, the working class. If it weren't for the proles' labor, mainly working in industry and on farms, Oceania would breakdown. The proles are uneducated and unorganized. They have no say in how anything is run and they seemingly don't care. It is because of their lack of education that the Party deems the proles to be of no threat to them. Because the proles pose no danger to the Party they are generally ignored and thought to be unworthy of attention. They are allowed freedoms and indulgences that are otherwise forbidden by members of the Party. They are permitted to indulge in pornography, prostitution, and other acts considered to be thoughtcrimes. They are allowed these freedoms simply because being that they are the masses, it would be impossible to observe all of them. By allowing the proles to indulge in these activities, it helps to keep them content. It is through their contentment that they are kept controlled and blinded from the higher political issues in society. Winston believes that the proles alone have the ability to change life in Oceania. He writes in his diary "If there is hope it lies in the proles" (71). Winston believes hope lies within the proles not only because they make up such a great deal of the population, but mainly because they have been able to hold onto their emotions and some semblance of life without Big Brother watching their every move.Winston realizes the power the proles could have if they united to fight for a common cause. This thought occurs to him when he remembers seeing the prole women arguing and shouting over the lack of saucepans. The women were shouting and causing a huge commotion. They were tugging and trying to pull the saucepans out of each other's hands. Instead of asking themselves why there were no pans available to them when there was such a demand for them, they accused the person selling the saucepans of favoritism. In doing so, they were directing their anger at the wrong person. By blaming each other and getting caught...

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