Lack Of Involvement: The Role Of The United States In The Bosnian War

2170 words - 9 pages

What is truth? Does truth lie in the actual stories of people that experienced the atrocities of war? Or does it lie in the teachers and textbooks students are handed all around the world? Controversial historical occurrences, mainly wars, often have tens if not hundreds of different stories and sides to them. One country claims it was a civil war, while another states it was genocide. In the curriculum for history in the United States, our country is often idealized. Criticisms of the United States or talk of what the United States could have done are sparse or essentially non-existent. Samantha Power, the author of “A Problem from Hell” addresses the unspoken issues of the United States lack of involvement in genocides all around the world. During the time of the Bosnian war, neither the Bush administration nor the Clinton administration intervened to help prevent hundreds of thousands of deaths and millions of displacements occurring in Bosnia.
Before 1991, Bosnia faced the difficult decision of staying one of Yugoslavia’s six republics or breaking away and becoming independent. Both options seemed to have negative outcomes for the most ethnically heterogeneous of the republics. By remaining a republic within Yugoslavia, Bosnia’s Serbian community would receive prestigious jobs and educational opportunities while the Muslim and Croatian people would be oppressed and physically abused under Milosevic’s rule. However, if Bosnia gained independence, Muslim citizens, who had to rely upon support from the international community, would be vulnerable. The Serbians and Croatians would be able to count on protection from Serbia and Croatia. The Bosnian presidency, consisting of seven members (two Muslims, two Serbs, two Croats, and one Yugoslav), held a referendum on independence in March of 1992 after instruction from Western diplomats (Power 248). Although 99% of voters chose to succeed from Yugoslavia, the two Serbian members of the presidency and most of the Serbian population in Bosnia boycotted the vote (Power 248). With the support of Milosevic, the Serbian nationalists and the presidency declared their own independent Bosnian Serbian state within the borders of the old Bosnia. The Yugoslavian National Army, dominated by Serbs, joined forces with the Bosnian Serb forces to create one huge super-force of 80,000 Serbian troops (Power 249). In 1991, the United Nations imposed an arms embargo to the region for the Serbs and Croats who were still in favor of a multiethnic Bosnia, while the Serbians began an undertaking of creating an “ethnically homogenous state” (Power 249).
In April 1992, The United States and EC granted legitimate diplomatic recognition to the newly independent state of Bosnia in hopes of stabilizing it (Power 249). This however, did nothing to stop the Bosnian Serb troops to begin rounding up non-Serb intellectuals, musicians, and professionals and executing them. Cultural and religious sites on non-Serbs were destroyed and...

Find Another Essay On Lack of Involvement: The Role of the United States in the Bosnian War

The United States’ Lack of Mental Health Care

1913 words - 8 pages About 75-80 million people in the United States are mentally ill to some extent (For the Mentally Ill, Finding Treatment Grows Harder). Many people are unaware of the treatments for the mentally ill and how few resources are available. Yes, if society looks from where society has come with the development of treatments, it has come a long ways. There is still more knowledge to be uncovered to ensure the United States gives the mentally ill care

Role of the United States Constitution

784 words - 3 pages would not have had the ability to gain wage increases or employment opportunities. The Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007 also "…includes a $4.84 billion package of assistance for small businesses to encourage employment and create jobs" (Eshoo, 2009, p.2, ¶2).The United States Constitution and its legal system play a significant role in how businesses establish regulation. The laws endeavored in these branches provide successful operations

Role of the United States Constitution

740 words - 3 pages referred to as Congress; the executive branch, which is often referred to as president; and the last branch, the judicial branch, which is commonly referred to as the courts. In order to ensure no branch would be more powerful than the other, checks and balances were built into the Constitution. Today’s paper will discuss my company insurance benefits as it relates to same sex marriage, and also illustrate the role of the United States

Emerging role of the United States in mid-20th century

948 words - 4 pages in the fall of 1945 and drove the Vietminh from many of the larger cities. The United States entered the Vietnam struggle in the 1950’s with the Truman administration sending the first U.S. aid package “The Military Assistance and Advisory Group” (MAAG), under the command of General Francis Brink which was to instruct the French, and the non-communist Vietnamese, in the use of the American weapons and tactics, which were being supplies in ever

The United States' Involvement in Afghanistan: Education is Necessary

1759 words - 7 pages Afghanistan's future.” (Address on the War in Afghanistan. 1). Second, we must protect the schools we build, for the benefit of Afghan students. Third, some of the funds, going to next 18 month’s war, must be used. This plan will not going to be easy, fast, or inexpensive , but it will be worth every second, cent and minute of hard work from every person involved. The United States original involvement in Afghanistan is attributed to

United States Involvement in World War II

1510 words - 6 pages The United State’s direct involvement in World War II officially began as soon as the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. Prior to that event, America had been providing arms and equipment to England but stopped short of any direct military confrontation with the Axis. The War in the Pacific was considered Asia’s War and the European War was considered a local conflict. US-Japanese relations had become strained in 1941, though America felt secure that

The Role of the Federal Reserve in the United States Economy

1480 words - 6 pages In this essay I will discuss the role of the Federal Reserve in the United States economy. In doing this I will look first at open market operations as a tool to influence money supply. Then, I will look at discount rate and federal funds target rate and how the Federal Reserve uses it to influence money supply. Lastly, I will look at required reserve ratio and  deposit expansion (money) multiplier as a tool the Federal Reserve uses to influence

The Role of Television in Ending Segregaation in the United States

2285 words - 9 pages The Role of Television in Ending Segregaation in the United States In 1964 segregation was banned in public places as part of The Civil Rights Act. Leading on from this, things for black Americans improved until in the 1987 17 large US cities even had black mayors. But before these times there was segregation everywhere, from schools and restaurants to buses and water fountains. Black and white Americans simply did

Role of the United States Constitution and Business Regulation

736 words - 3 pages University of PhoenixThe role of the United States Constitution in business falls under Article I, Clause 3, Commerce Power, Power to Regulate Commerce. The role will be discussed in this paper along with a current example from today's world. The example will show how Constitutional rights can affect business and how our legal system will be used to protect those rights.The Commerce ClauseCongress has the sole power to govern commerce or

The Role of Culture and Leadership in the United States Air Force

1351 words - 5 pages The Role of Culture and Leadership in the United States Air Force Merriam Webster’s dictionary defines culture as “the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that characterizes an institution or organization” and leadership as “the act or an instance of leading.” The United States Air Force, like any other large organization, relies on leadership at all levels to effectively operate its mission. Further, the United States Air

Role of the United States Supreme Court in obtaining equality for Blacks during Reconstruction

1595 words - 6 pages The role played by the United States' Supreme Court in obtaining equality for Black Americans was one of immense stature. The Supreme Court is the court that can only consider federal questions, or anything to do with federal law. Since obtaining equality for Blacks was such a trivial process and the legislation that was involved was open to much interpretation, much responsibility rested with the Supreme Court from 1896 to 1996 in determining

Similar Essays

Lack Of Privacy In The United States

1095 words - 4 pages persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. (The United States) The personal privacy has been saved under American law since the 20th century. People can claim their right of living in a country that does not

United States' Involvement In The Vietnam War

1173 words - 5 pages United States' Involvement in the Vietnam War There are many reasons for American intervention in Vietnam whether it is political causes, economic causes or military causes. The Americans want to secure capitalism all over the world and get rid of communism. The French used to run Vietnam in a capitalist manner. After the Second World War France attempted to secure and control Vietnam once more. France refused to

Reasons For The United States Involvement In The Vietnam War

1100 words - 4 pages The United States became increasingly involved with the War in Vietnam mostly thanks to their enmity with Russia due to the fact they were Communist, and how the USSR spread claiming countries that could’ve been turned democratic and become trading partners of the US. While Russia, Britain and the USA were all allies in WW1, they disagreed on many things, especially on how Germany should be punished and how should Europe be handled. THE USSR

The United States' Involvement In Vietnam

1878 words - 8 pages The United States' Involvement in Vietnam Vietnam is a country in South-East Asia and was a part of the old French colony known as Indo-China. During the Second World War Vietnam was captured by the Japanese from the French and a Vietnamese resistance organisation was formed, they were called the Vietminh. The leader was Ho Chi Minh who was a devout communist. After the Second World War had ended, France was part of the