Living In The Wild In Jon Krakauer's Novel "Into The Wild" And Jack London's Novel "The Call Of The Wild."

1163 words - 5 pages

Living in a civilized society and in the wild are two totally different experiences. Life in a civilized society is well organized and developed; people can enjoy a comfortable and convenient life because of its agriculture, technology and art. In contrast, being in the wild is going back to nature where no humans are involved. Nevertheless, some people still choose to live in the wild. In Jon Krakauer's novel "Into The Wild", a young man named Chris McCandless gave up a civilized life and hitchhiked to the wilderness of Alaska. His decision is partly influenced by Jack London's novel "The Call of the Wild". The book is about how a civilized dog, Buck, goes back to the wild. Both Buck and Chris McCandless have gone from civilization into the wild and have struggled with their journeys. In return, Buck turns to be very violent while Chris stays in his good nature.Even though Buck and Chris McCandless are from rich families, they have different attitudes toward their wealthy lives. It doesn't seem to make sense to compare a dog with human. Nevertheless, Buck is a symbol of Jack London's life and he is given emotion and human behaviors. Buck lives in Judge Miller's house in Santa Clara Valley. Unlike other dogs, he is under good care and receives the love from his master. Every day he spends time playing with the judge's grandchildren and doesn't have to worry about anything. And because Buck's father is the best friend with the Judge, so naturally after his father's death, he gets the privileges from the Judge. Buck holds an important place in the household:"Among the terriers he stalked imperiously, and Toots and Ysabel he utterly ignored, for he was kind - king over all creeping, crawling, flying things of Judge Miller's place, humans included" (London 22). He is superior over other dogs and he is on the top. Buck enjoys his life and has pride in himself. Like Buck, Chris McCandless also receives a lot of attention and care from his parents. His parents work very hard in order to provide their children a good life. They save $25,000 for Chris's college fund. Right after he graduates they want to buy him a new car. His parents expect him to go to law school after college graduation. However, Chris doesn't like his parents to tell him what to do. Also he feels that wealth is evil. As Chris's mother recalls, "my son, the teenage Tolstoyan, believed that wealth was shameful, corrupting, inherently evil..."(Krakauer 115). Chris doesn't feel positive with what he had.That Buck and Chris go into the wild is due to different reasons. In "The Call of The Wild", because the news that someone has found a piece of gold and the development of steamship and transportation, many people rush into the Northland. It leads to the demand of more heavy dogs, and Buck is the victim of this rush. He is stolen by Manuel, one of the garden helpers and is sold to the North (London 22-23). While Buck is forced to go into the Wild, Chris decides to hitchhike to Alaska...

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