Montgomery Bus Boycotts: Role Of Women In The Civil Rights Movement

1109 words - 4 pages

Montgomery Bus Boycotts: Role of Women in the Civil Rights Movement

During the Civil Rights movement of the 1950's and 60's, women played an undeniably significant role in forging the path against discrimination and oppression. Rosa Parks and Jo Ann Robinson were individual women whose efforts deserve recognition for instigating and coordinating the Montgomery Bus Boycotts of 1955 that would lay precedent for years to come that all people deserved equal treatment despite the color of their skin. The WPC, NAACP, and the Montgomery Churches provided the channels to organize the black public into a group that could not be ignored as well supported the black community throughout the difficult time of the boycott.

The 20th century brought a tidal wave of tolerance and equal rights for a diverse variety of people in the United States. When the century opened, women did not have an equal position with their male counter parts either in the public or private sectors of society. Women first received their right to vote with the passage of the 19th amendment in 1920, and the beginnings of an equal footing in the workplace during the obligatory utilization of American women as factory employees during the Second World War. Similarly, African Americans spent the 1950's and 60's fighting for their own basic civil rights that had been denied them, such as going to the school or restaurant of their choice. Or something as simple and unpretentious as where they were allowed to sit on a bus. However, by the end of the 20th Century, women, blacks, and other minorities could be found in the highest echelons of American Society. From the corporate offices of IBM, to the U.S. Supreme Court bench, an obvious ideological revolution bringing integration and acceptance of a variety of human beings had taken place, but only at the expense of great amounts of sweat and blood.

One of the Champions of the American Civil Rights Movement was Rosa Parks. A native of Tuskegee Alabama, she was said by some to be the mother of the African American Civil Rights Movement. Making a living as a seamstress, she was highly involved in the local efforts of the N.A.A.C.P. (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) as well as exceedingly active in her church congregation, Rosa Parks would become infamous for simply refusing to be treated differently because of the color of her skin. Aboard the Cleveland Avenue bus coming home from work on the evening of December 1st 1955, an already weary Rosa Parks was instructed by the bus driver to surrender her seat to a Caucasian man who had boarded the bus subsequent to her. When she refused to do so, the police were summoned and she consequentially was arrested. This was her first time to be under arrest, but she conducted herself in a professional and dignified manner despite the extreme injustice she was being served (Johnson 212). Jo Ann Robinson called Rasa Parks a woman of "high morals and a strong character"....

Find Another Essay On Montgomery Bus Boycotts: Role of Women in the Civil Rights Movement

Role of James Baldwin in the Civil Rights Movement

1630 words - 7 pages on which group they would become associated with. This inspired many writers to publicly display their beliefs on the issue. In “Down at the Cross,” Baldwin displays favor toward the methodology of the NAACP in the Civil Rights Movement because of their beliefs in the American system. Even though he was partial towards the NAACP he still believed in some of the teachings of the Nation of Islam especially in their views of keeping Black pride and

The Mother of the Freedom Movement: The Montgomery Bus Boycott

993 words - 4 pages The Mother of the Freedom Movement In 1955, an African-American seamstress helped cause the civil rights movement in the United States, and her name was Rosa Parks. Rosa Parks was an African-American civil rights activist. Many know her by “the first lady of civil rights” or “the mother of the freedom movement.” Rosa Parks once said, “I’d see the bus pass everyday, but to me, that was a way of life; we had no choice but to accept what was the

The role of young people in the civil rights movement of the early and late 1960s

811 words - 3 pages ended all state racial segregations. This will tell you the large role that young children played in the civil rights movement for the following: The Freedom Rides, The Children’s March, and The Orangeburg Massacre. The Freedom Rides took place in the early May, 1961 where two groups of students riding in integrated Greyhound buses would stop at rest stops and blacks would go into white only bathrooms and whites would go into black only bathrooms

The Role of the Supreme Court, Government, Economics, and Protests in the Civil Rights Movement

1638 words - 7 pages There were four different elements that contributed to the success of the Civil Rights Movement: the Supreme Court, the Government, the economic situation of the time, and the protests of the movement. The role, which the Supreme Court's played in the success of the civil rights movement, was essentially one of neutrality. The Supreme Court ordered the segregation of schools and other public facilities, known as the policy of separate but equal

The Role of the Supreme Court in the Civil Rights Movement

1933 words - 8 pages Paterson, the ‘clear-cut decision’ came ‘in the knick-of time'10 for the protest movement, which might not have succeeded without the ruling by the court. Even here, however, the court was unable to enforce the actions. One observer recalled a ‘bus station ... still rigorously segregated’11, in 1966. These examples show the Supreme Court as advancing the Civil Rights by passing favourable and motivating rulings, but it certainly fell short when it

Media Coverage of the Emmitt Till Murder Played a Major Role in the Civil Rights Movement

1678 words - 7 pages Parks to stand up to racism by sitting down on a bus. Rosa was, like millions around the globe, informed of and deeply moved by the stories and photographs of Emmett she had seen in the media leading up to the fateful day on the bus. Emmett Till’s mother recognized the important pivotal role her son’s tragedy played in the Civil Rights movement. His Mom knew that Emmett’s story had to be told to the world so that her son would not die in vain. In

Media Coverage of the Emmitt Till Murder Played a Major Role in the Civil Rights Movement

1534 words - 7 pages up to racism by sitting down on a bus. She was, like millions around the globe, informed of and deeply moved by the stories and photographs of Emmett she had seen in the media leading up to the fateful day on the bus. Emmett Till’s mother recognized the important pivotal role her son’s tragedy played in the Civil Rights movement. She knew that his story had to be told to the world so that her son would not die in vain. In conclusion, Mamie Till

The Civil Rights Movement

982 words - 4 pages , however following the many years of anti-black violence and hatred, was it enough to change the mindset of the American people? The Montgomery Bus Boycott One of the first and most recognized events of the Civil Rights Movement was the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and is regarded as the first large-scale demonstration against segregation in the U.S (Montgomery Bus Boycott). In Montgomery, Alabama there was a city ordinance in place requiring blacks

The Civil Rights Movement

1662 words - 7 pages all, however following the many years of anti-black violence and, unadulterated loathing towards African Americans, was it enough to change the mindset of the American people? The Montgomery Bus Boycott One of the first and most known events of the Civil Rights Movement was the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and is regarded as the first large-scale demonstration against segregation in the United States (Montgomery Bus Boycott). In Montgomery, Alabama

The Civil Rights Movement

1705 words - 7 pages was unconstitutional and blacks and whites traveled on the bus together for the first time. In 1957, he was elected the president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. This was formed to provide new leadership for the Civil Rights movement. From this time, to the day he died in 1968, he wrote five books and read two thousand and five hundred speeches. He directed the peaceful march on Washington, D.C. He delivered his “I had a dream

The Civil Rights Movement - 3343 words

3343 words - 14 pages States Supreme Court. The Supreme Court ruled that Montgomery’s buses must be integrated. The valor of one woman and the determination of an entire community made a remarkable difference within society. This incredible event symbolized the first major protest of the Civil Rights Movement. With the instantaneous success of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the head of the MIA, Martin Luther King Junior, had emerged as a potent voice in the civil rights

Similar Essays

The Role Of African American Women In The Civil Rights Movement

2573 words - 10 pages (SCLC), and many others. Even if they were not directly involved in organizations, however, many black women became informal leaders of movements and/or enthusiastic participants. A few famous example of black women’s involvement are: Citizenship Schools in South Carolina, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, And various women’s involvement in political groups and organizations. One of the most influential women involved in the Civil Rights Movement

The Significance Of Martin Luther King As A Civil Rights Activist In Relation To The Montgomery Bus Boycott

1310 words - 5 pages The Montgomery bus boycott looms as a formative turning point of the twentieth century as it was the harbinger of the African American freedom movement, and the springboard for the leadership of Martin Luther King Jr. in civil rights, human rights and peacemaking. On December 1st, 1955 a forty-two year old black woman by the name of Rosa Parks boarded a bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Rosa sat in the first seat of the black section in the segregated

Role Of The Media In The Civil Rights Movement

1174 words - 5 pages question the validity of our beliefs. The March on Washington in August of 1963 reached everyday citizens through their televisions, followed by the murders of three Mississippi civil rights workers and the search for their bodies, it became clear that the Civil Rights Movement concerned everyone. People began to become involved and take an interest. It is a widely held belief that the media is in part responsible for the advancement of the

Role Of Jesse Jackson In The Black Civil Rights Movement

943 words - 4 pages scholarship to the University of Illinois. During his first year, he became dissatisfied with his treatment on the campus and on the field. He was told that as a black he could not expect to play quarterback. Less than a year later, Jesse decided to finish his college years in the south, thus transferring to North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College in Greensboro, North Carolina. Jackson first became involved in the Civil Rights movement