Overview Of Victorian Novels Essay

1527 words - 6 pages

Victorian Novels
I have always been a reader; even though I read books mainly written in my native language, I still enjoy wandering through novels that written in English. I love to discover new cultures, ideas, and believe. Also, I enjoy criticizing the author and understand his or her writing style. Most of the time, I try to find a different ends to the same story. When I was a child, books were every thing in my life , as of today books is the second most important thing to me, while my children and their education are always come first . Since I was a child, any simple thing in the story can attract my attention, such as the name of objects, authors, unique practices or the name of other religions. As I read Carr's book The Shallows, So many things attract my attention. However, the most important thing that attracts my interest and loved to learn more about is the Victorians Novels. Carr mentioned the Victorian novels in chapter six , he said "when a printed book, whether a recently published scholarly history or two hundred year old Victorian novel is transferred to an electronic device connected to the internet, it turn into something like a web site , its words become wrapped in all distractions of the net worked computer. Its links and other digital enhancements propel the reader hither and yon. It loses what the lat John Updike called its "edge" and dissolves into the vast, rolling waters of the Net "(104). The word Victorians made me think about the famous queen of England Queen Victoria, mainly I imagined the way she looked, dressed, talked, and how powerful she was? But I did not have any idea or image of the Victorian novels, and the extraordinary authors who worked so hard to write them, who are they? What recognize them? At the same time, Carr mention that the Victorian novels were two hundred years old, so what make them so memorable for all those years? Why we desperately need to read them? Why we always attached to them? What made them so unique and valuable?
As we all know that the historical period effect the literally world deeply, the name that was given to the novels was borrowed from the royal queen of England, Queen Victoria. She sat on the throne from the year 1837 to the year 1901. The Victorian period always considered the golden ages of English novels, there were more than 60,000 novels published in Britain in those years. There was a huge development in political, social and educational live. Industrials revolution that happen in the Victorian period, causes the literacy rate to grow faster and many people started to read and learn more. All of that encouraged many authors to write and print thousands of the most extraordinary novels. At the same time, children start learning to read and the literature for young people become a growing business. The Victorians novels always considered the main inventor of the childhood stories. Also, the authors in that period used their novels to help stopping children...

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