Issue Of Privacy In The Workplace.

1201 words - 5 pages

The Employee handbook plays an important role in communicating the organization's policies as well as rules and regulations. It gives the employee a source to understand some of the responsibilities, benefits, wages, appraisals and restrictions of both the employee and the employer. One of the main areas of the handbook deals with privacy issues in the workplace. There are several areas to consider when writing a privacy policy. These areas include: the company's position in response to privacy rights issues, privacy protections to limit the company's liability, privacy protections to enhance employee motivation and productivity, ethical considerations and different ways to address state, federal, and international laws.Employees have a reasonable expectation of privacy within the workplace; however there are circumstances when an employer has a legitimate right to monitor, investigate, and review the activities of its employees. The following identifies business practices that may be executed to ensure the integrity of company products and property, and the monitoring of employee productivity.Internet, E-mail, Voice mail - the internal communication systems, as well as the equipment and data stored, are and remain at all times the property of the Company. Accordingly, all messages and files created, sent, received or stored within the system should be related to Company business only. It should be noted that although a message or file is deleted or erased, it is still possible to retrieve the message; therefore, ultimate privacy of messages cannot be assured. The Company reserves the right to routinely monitor usage patterns of its e-mail and Internet communications.The Company strictly prohibits using its e-mail, voice mail, instant messaging or computer systems:* for sending, knowingly receiving, downloading, displaying, printing, or otherwise disseminating any material (1) that violates any Company policy, including our policy against discrimination and harassment, (2) that is sexually explicit, racially or ethnically offensive, profane, obscene, fraudulent, defamatory, or unlawful, or (3) that may be seen as harmful to morale or disruptive, insulting, or offensive by another person. Examples of forbidden transmissions include sexually explicit messages, cartoons, or jokes; unwelcome propositions or love notes; ethnic or racial slurs; or any other message construed to be harassment or disparagement based on sex, race, color, national origin, religion, age, disability, or sexual orientation.* to disseminate or store destructive programs (e.g., viruses or self-replicating code), political or religious endorsements or solicitations, or any other unauthorized materials;* to waste computer resources by sending mass mailings or chain letters, spending unnecessary or excessive amounts of time on the Internet, playing games (except during approved lunch periods), engaging in online chat groups, unnecessarily printing multiple copies of documents, or...

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