Review Of "Huckleberry Finn".

1067 words - 4 pages

According to The San Francisco Chronicle, Huck Finn "must be pronounced the most amusing book Mark Twain has written for years." The article adds, "There is no limit to his (Twain's) inventive genius, and the best proof of its range and originality is found in this book." Needless to say, the book is given a favorable review by this publication for its creativity and its consistently entertaining storyline. The characters are engrossing and their descriptions and developments are "always good." The characters' antics are unforgettable, most notably, Huck and his companions' adventures while they travel through the Mississippi. Events such as the usurpation of Peter Wilk's brothers, Huck's cross-dressing, and Tom's eccentric ideas which transformed into the actual plan to save Jim are all particularly noteworthy. Nevertheless, not all of the bits in the story are, "an attempt at caricature." The review emphasizes that the settings in the story are very realistic. Ranging from the Phelps' one-horse cotton plantation to the small towns along the Mississippi, the locations are believable. The vernacular and commonplace customs are also noticeable. The article states, "Any one who has ever lived in the South, or who has visited that section, will recognize the truth of all these sketches and the art which they are brought into this story." All of these qualities make the experience of reading the book enjoyable, hence "The volume is very well gotten up, the illustrations adding materially to the fun of the story."The San Francisco Evening Bulletin views Huck Finn as anything but a masterpiece. The review declares that, "his (Twain's) books have the character of commercial ventures. He probably estimates in advance his profit...no book (Huck Finn) has been put on the market with more advertising." While the positive review sees humor as the strong point of the story, this one says the opposite. The article proclaims "it is an amusing story if such scrap-work can be called a story. There is so little genuine wit in the world, that the little must be made to go a great way. The funny book will always be read in this world of dryness and dearth." The review dismisses the book as clever money-making tool. The humor in the book undoubtedly will be the selling point of the book, which has a weak plot; hence, "here is very little literary art in the story. It is a string of incidents ingenuously fastened together." The article also attacks the characters," Huckleberry Finn is, in a restricted sense, a typical character...the type is not desirable, nor is it one that must parents want a future of promise or their young folks without some hesitation. Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn are not too good for this world; even as the world goes, they are not good enough."Obviously, the antics and the characters of the book are condemned by the review, as it sets a bad example for young readers.I think that neither of the two of the reviews seems to fully understand or...

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