Rhetorical Analysis Of Lincoln's Second Inaugural Speech

659 words - 3 pages

'With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.' In the delivery of Lincoln's 'Second Inaugural,' many were inspired by this uplifting and keen speech. It had been a long war, and Lincoln was concerned about the destruction that had taken place. Worn-out from seeing families torn apart and friendships eradicated, he interpreted his inaugural address. It was March of 1865, and the war, he believed, must come to an end before it was too late. The annihilation that had taken place was tragic, and Lincoln brawled for a closure. The 'Second Inaugural' was very influential, formal, and emotional.

Lincoln's style in this speech was inevitably persuasive. His rhetorical strategy appeals to not only the readers senses, but to their intellectual knowledge as well. ?The progress of our arms, upon which all else chiefly depends, is as well known to the public as to myself, and it is, I trust, reasonably satisfactory and encouraging to all. With high hope for the future, no prediction in regard to it is ventured.? The amplification and sugar-coating of this passage accentuates the statement he is trying to reason with the addressees. Once the attention is drawn, and all eyes are on him, he proceeds by exposing the tragedies that caused this mishap, and the catastrophic disaster they are enduring. ?Both parties deprecated war, but one of them would make war rather than let the nation survive, and the other would accept war rather than let it perish, and the war came.? Sympathetic toward both the north and south motives, he logically accepts that neither...

Find Another Essay On Rhetorical Analysis of Lincoln's Second Inaugural Speech

Rhetorical Analysis of Antony’s Funeral Speech

1129 words - 5 pages believing in Caesar and consequently, the Second Triumvirate. By combining a subtle use of questions and interjections to keep audience engaged, a variety of rhetorical devices devices that dignify Caesar and himself, and an effective use of all three modes of persuasion, Antony is able to convert the audience to his cause while destroying the conspirators’ credibility.   While Mark Antony’s speech is a eulogy Caesar’s funeral, it gradually

Rhetorical Analysis of JFK's Inauguration Speech

910 words - 4 pages entire world. The address was written to encourage American citizens to get involved with their country and with the issues of the time. This speech reassured the voters that they made the correct choice and informed the country that changes were on there way. The inaugural speech was arranged so that it flowed easily from start to finish. The first paragraph contains many uses of comparison and contrast. For example, “We observe today not a

Rhetorical Analysis of Swami Vivekananda’s Speech

853 words - 3 pages the numerous human minds of those times. First, it is important to underline the rhetorical introduction of Swami Vivekananda. Indeed, Hindu monk surprised and quite shocked a lot of attendants on the meeting with non-standard intro: “Sisters and Brothers of America” (1). There was no addressing to Mrs. or Ms., as well as he did not start his speech with standard cliché ‘ladies and gentlemen’. Practically, Swami used powerful metaphoric

Native Son: analysis of rhetorical strategies- max's final speech

511 words - 2 pages when we first came here, are struggling within unbelievably narrow limits to achieve that feeling of at-home-ness for which we once strove so ardently." Max's speech combines the rhetorical strategies of similes, cause and effect, and comparison to convey his views on racial maltreatment and persecution. He effectively illustrates the very parts of society that caused Bigger's actions, and makes an notably moving case for Bigger's life.

Analysis of JFK’s Inaugural Address in 1961

1088 words - 4 pages Analysis of JFK’s Inaugural Address in 1961 Throughout history, Presidents have used the Inaugural Address as an opportunity to help the mental framework of the American people and to the greater world. In order to effectively do so, those who craft the address must exhibit a mastery of rhetoric. More so than in other writing pieces, an Inaugural Address by nature appeals more to the rhetorical element of emotion

Rhetorical Analysis Of "I Have A Dream" Speech By Martin Luther King Jr

935 words - 4 pages From the steps of the Lincoln Memorial more than two score years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King electrified America with his momentous "I Have a Dream" speech. Aimed at the entire nation, King’s main purpose in this speech was to convince his audience to demand racial justice towards the mistreated African Americans and to stand up together for the rights afforded to all under the Constitution. To further convey this purpose more effectively, King

Rhetorical Analysis of Martin Luther King's I Have A Dream Speech

1084 words - 4 pages The famous “I Have a Dream” speech delivered by Martin Luther King, Jr. at the historic March in Washington in August 1963 effectively urged the US government to take actions and to finally set up equality between the black and white people in America. Although there were many factors that contributed to the success of the speech, it was primarily King’s masterly use of different rhetorical instruments that encouraged Kennedy and his team to

Rhetorical Analysis of Martin Luther King's I Have A Dream Speech

907 words - 4 pages Rhetoric: "The use of words by human agents to form attitudes or induce actions in other human agents....The use of language as a symbolic means of inducing cooperation in human beings that by nature respond to symbols." If Kenneth Burke is correct, then I would propose that speakers who use the technique of Rhetoric properly will thoroughly "induce" their listeners to action. Perhaps no other speech nor speaker eloquently used rhetoric

Rhetorical Analysis of Martin Luther King's I Have A Dream Speech

989 words - 4 pages “all God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentile, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing” because he knows this is movement is greater than just for those of color. By expressing his emotions on the subject of racism, Kings persuasive speech influenced and impacted America, for the better in the early 1960’s. With his many uses of different rhetorical devices such as allusions, metaphors and smiles, and anaphoras Kings speech truly changed the minds of hundreds of thousands of people.

Rhetorical Analysis of Andrew Shepherd's Speech in Movie, The American President

1089 words - 4 pages . In the closing scenes of the movie, Shepherd is found defending himself and his character through the form of a rhetorical speech. He convincingly uses pathos to appeal to his audience’s sense of nationality and pride. As a typical politician should, Shepherd uses emotional appeal or pathos in his defense. When defending character, when defending emotion, the most logical approach is pathos. If one uses emotion to defend himself from

Rhetorical Analysis of Professional Writing

1654 words - 7 pages to meet current and future demands. Karen, throughout the article, used several rhetorical strategies and rhetorical appeals. The ones that have will be discussing throughout the essay, are analysis of cause and/or effect, comparison and contrast, and exemplification. The appeal that will requires attention and discussion in the essay is logos. To further elaborate on strategies and appeal, I will use details and examples of how Karen used

Similar Essays

Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address Essay

668 words - 3 pages Abraham Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address, was delivered March 4, 1865. During this time, he was in the process of attempting to mend both sides of the war. Instead of giving a victory speech to the North or a blame filled speech to the South, he instead spoke to both of them, in the attempt to have war reconciliation. In his address, Lincoln discusses slavery and the war between the North and South. This leads readers to believe he is talking

Abraham Lincoln's "Second Inaugural Address" Essay

1318 words - 6 pages “The pattern of the prodigal is: rebellion, ruin, repentance, reconciliation, restoration” (Edwin Louis Cole). Abraham Lincoln’s “Second Inaugural Address” is a speech that highlights every point in Cole’s quote. He, Lincoln, talks about how the south manages to rebel, how their economy will be left in ruin, how they will repent and be forgiven by both God and the North, how the North and the South will reconcile, and finally he talks of how

President Obama’s Inaugural Speech: Rhetorical Analysis

1016 words - 4 pages President Obama’s Inaugural Speech: Rhetorical Analysis Barrack Obama’s inauguration speech successfully accomplished his goal by using rhetoric to ensure our nation that we will be under safe hands. The speech is similar from ideas obtained from the founding documents and Martin Luther King’s speech to establish ‘our’ goal to get together and take some action on the problems our country is now facing. As President Barrack Obama starts his

Rhetorical Analysis Of President Obama's Inauguration Speech

1398 words - 6 pages have the power and control to change the nation for the better. A second part of the rhetorical triangle Obama incorporates in his speech is logos. Logos is using facts, surveys, polls, statistics, and any information possible to validate an argument. Obama mentions how costly health care, failing schools, job shedding, lost housing, and high energy use are all “data and statistics” that are “indicators of crisis” (Barack Obama's Inaugural