Rhetorical Analysis Of Andrew Shepherd's Speech In Movie, The American President

1089 words - 4 pages

A president has to have character, right? I mean, if the leader of the free world has no substance, nothing special about him, then how do we as citizens know that he is capable as far as foreign policies go. How do we know that we can trust him to make wise decisions? How do we know that he will tell us the truth? This concept is exactly what fictional president Andrew Shepherd successfully conveys in his “Address to the Press on Bob Rumson and the Crime Bill.” In the movie, The American President, Andrew Shepherd becomes romantically involved with crime bill lobbyist Sydney Ellen Wade. Many characters, including Bob Rumson, believe that the relationship between Shepherd and Wade is hindering the advancement of the country. They believe that this relationship shows lack of character, and it is made apparent to Shepherd through the side comments and actions of those opposing him. In the closing scenes of the movie, Shepherd is found defending himself and his character through the form of a rhetorical speech. He convincingly uses pathos to appeal to his audience’s sense of nationality and pride.

As a typical politician should, Shepherd uses emotional appeal or pathos in his defense. When defending character, when defending emotion, the most logical approach is pathos. If one uses emotion to defend himself from emotional attacks, one is capable of producing a very strong persuasive argument. Give the opposition a taste of their own medicine. Shepherd does exactly that when address’s the American people. He talks about the constitution, the foundation on which this great country is built.

“For the record, yes, I am a card carrying member of the ACLU, but the more important question is ‘Why aren’t you, Bob?’ Now this is an organization whose sole purpose is to defend the Bill f Rights, so it naturally begs the question, why would a senator, his party’s most powerful spokesmen and candidate for president, choose to reject upholding the Constitution?”

Think about the constitution; think about when it was made and what it was made for. The Constitution is the very first concrete document that lasted in this country. It was made by the very first citizens and it was made with pride. Before the constitution came to life the United States was looked upon, by many nations, similarly to a child attempting to grow up too fast. Great Britain, the country that the constitution freed us from, did not think the United States was going to make it alone. Great Britain was right. The United States could not make it alone. The United States needed something to help it along. They needed the constitution. Because of this strong link between the constitution and the survival of the United States, many patriots, including Shepherd, have an emotional attachment to the constitution. Because of that link many patriots perceive attacks on the constitution as personal attacks. In this excerpt from the speech, Shepherd is found attacking Rumson by using one...

Find Another Essay On Rhetorical Analysis of Andrew Shepherd's Speech in Movie, The American President

How did the election of Andrew Jackson as President mark the beginning of a new age in American political history?

1126 words - 5 pages In the following essay, based on my knowledge of history and historical data, I will prove that Andrew Jackson's election as President marked the beginning of a new age in American political history.The election of Andrew Jackson as President in 1829 marked the beginning of an era known as Jacksonian Democracy or the Age of the Common Man. The changes in politics during Jackson's presidency provided various social and economic changes.Actually

Rhetorical Analysis of President Reagan's Challenger Address

993 words - 4 pages had the problematic undertaking of gracefully picking America back up by its boot straps. President Reagan, at the time in the beginnings of his second term, had successfully maintained overall a high approval rating with the American people. He had won their trust and respect by being quite relatable to the average citizen (Cannon). He had planned that evening to give his State of the Union address, but instead postponed it. The tragedy that

Rhetorical Analysis of the Movie Thank You for Smoking

1129 words - 5 pages Nick Naylor, a lobbyist for Big Tobacco companies uses rhetoric to persuade his audience that smoking is not as unsafe as perceived by the society, by shifting its dangers to unimportant issues. As the lead campaigner for Big Tobacco Companies, he is hired to create a positive image of tobacco thereby maximizing profit for these companies. In the movie “Thank you for smoking,” Naylor employs various fallacies to demonstrate how arguments can

Analysis of President Obama's State of the Union Speech

1068 words - 4 pages rail in American will create more jobs in this industry. Investing in high-speed wireless coverage will result in Americas business establishing a connection to the global market. By investing in Americans current infrastructure we can keep the construction industry going and thus insure that these men and women also have jobs. A final analysis of the speech would describe it as a road map to creating new jobs and industries in America by investing

Rhetorical Analysis of Swami Vivekananda’s Speech

853 words - 3 pages Columbian Exhibition of 1893 in Chicago was the first attempt of global religious leaders to unlock and disclose the truth about all beliefs across the globe and first effort to reinforce the humans’ attitude to the values of each religion in particular. One Indian monk, without a coin in his pockets, intentionally left his motherland and visited American assembly in order to participate in the parliamentary meeting. It was Swami Vivekananda who

Rhetorical Analysis of Antony’s Funeral Speech

1129 words - 5 pages believing in Caesar and consequently, the Second Triumvirate. By combining a subtle use of questions and interjections to keep audience engaged, a variety of rhetorical devices devices that dignify Caesar and himself, and an effective use of all three modes of persuasion, Antony is able to convert the audience to his cause while destroying the conspirators’ credibility.   While Mark Antony’s speech is a eulogy Caesar’s funeral, it gradually

Rhetorical Analysis of JFK's Inauguration Speech

910 words - 4 pages John Fitzgerald Kennedy delivered one of the most important American speeches after being sworn in as president on January 20, 1961. His inauguration speech was so influential that it seized the nation’s attention, and quotes from it are still clearly remembered by people today. It is considered one of the best speeches ever written and ever delivered. It presents a strong appeal to pathos, ethos, and logos and accomplishes what any speaker

Rhetorical Analysis of Lincoln's Second Inaugural Speech

659 words - 3 pages influential, formal, and emotional. Lincoln's style in this speech was inevitably persuasive. His rhetorical strategy appeals to not only the readers senses, but to their intellectual knowledge as well. ?The progress of our arms, upon which all else chiefly depends, is as well known to the public as to myself, and it is, I trust, reasonably satisfactory and encouraging to all. With high hope for the future, no prediction in regard to it is

"Logic in Love" : analysis of John Nash's nobel prize speech in the movie "A Beautiful Mind"

664 words - 3 pages is a quote from John Nash's fictional Nobel Prize speech. In actual fact, he was never asked to speak upon his acceptance of the prize. Regardless, this combination of words still speaks a powerful message, one that contradicts western society's modern beliefs that love is irrational. He states that the only logical reasons lie within a feeling, an emotion that we have termed 'love'. Nash was a man who lived his life based on "verifiable

An American Family: Rhetorical Analysis of "Searching in the Wrong Places" by Heather Koehler

555 words - 2 pages Every person pictures a different image when it comes to the ideal "All-American Family." I believe that for every person their interpretation is different due to our culture, histories, and family life. What Heather Koehler does in the essay is collapses the belief that the "All American Family" is limited to how it is portrayed in Leave it to Beaver. Without hesitation when I am asked what the ideal family is to me I would presumably think of

Rhetorical Analysis of Obama’s First Two Speeches as President

1600 words - 6 pages . Goals and aims that helping to solve the current problems that most of the citizens had. Also, the president used through his speech we to connect himself the public and he stands as citizen like them. Moreover, President Obama proved how American citizens able to change and he provided an example of himself when he said “why a man whose father less than 60 years ago might not have been served in a local restaurant can now stand before you to take

Similar Essays

Rhetorical Analysis Of President Obama's Inauguration Speech

1398 words - 6 pages On January 20, 2009, President Obama was officially inaugurated and sworn in as the forty-fourth president of the United States of America. The tradition of being inaugurated requires the president to give a speech about the goals they want to reach during their presidency. The president must make a speech that appeals to the audience while being professional. Rhetoric is a useful strategy to utilize in speech making. Obama uses rhetoric to

Rhetorical Analysis Of President Roosevelt's Pearl Harbor Speech

1285 words - 5 pages . FDR used a combination of logic and emotion throughout his speech to convince Congress and the people of the United States that going to war with Japan would be the right thing to do. The President knew that at a time like this the people of the United States felt that their lives were in great danger. He let the people know that all measures would be taken for the country’s defense. He knew that many people would be afraid to enter the

President Obama’s Inaugural Speech: Rhetorical Analysis

1016 words - 4 pages President Obama’s Inaugural Speech: Rhetorical Analysis Barrack Obama’s inauguration speech successfully accomplished his goal by using rhetoric to ensure our nation that we will be under safe hands. The speech is similar from ideas obtained from the founding documents and Martin Luther King’s speech to establish ‘our’ goal to get together and take some action on the problems our country is now facing. As President Barrack Obama starts his

Rhetorical Analysis Of Crash The Movie

1328 words - 5 pages others. Crash is a movie that really gets people to look at their own prejudices and to the roots of their morality by showing the hidden racism and prejudices that are very present in our society and even in ourselves today. If this movie were to be summarized in one sentence, one may say that no matter who you are, everybody holds preconceptions and stereotypes against other people. For example, in this movie, an upper-class white woman sees