Robert Frost's Experience Of Nature Essay

934 words - 4 pages

Robert Frost wrote his poems during the early- to mid-20th century, and that was during the time period of a huge change in the rural community. This was a very influential point for the people in America, because of the drastic changes of a rural community. People were used to living on secluded farms, that had no grocery store and everything relied on their work on the farm. Children would grow up around nature and using the world around them as their playground. With the new rural community people were getting away from the isolation and moving into mass groups into cities, which rid of nature as a playground for little kids. It seemed as if nature was being thrown out of the picture as the world grew, but Robert Frost made a point of including the beauty and importance of nature in his poems. There is something poetic about nature, and Robert Frost always mentioned these in his poems. In Frost’s poems, Birches, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, and Out, Out-, he includes the importance for children to play on trees, to admire all nature around, and to stop to admire nature sometimes.
In Birches, Frost recalls childhood memories of swinging on willow tree branches, and pleads for his life to start over to experience the same thing; it is important for kids to experience nature this way. Kids are the youngest and most lively in the community, with all of that comes a lot of energy. The best way to exclude energy is to get it out of their system, and a strong tree branch to swing on might be the best way. Not only do they get to have huge amounts of fun, and exclude exess energy, but they experience nature in a whole new way. Robert Frost looked at the drooping branches with a view of opptomistic, because he understood that a kid might have had a great memory making time swinging on that branch. It is important for children to play with nature this way, they have the desire to learn at a young age, and the best way to learn is by doing. Frost made it clear to include children in Birches to show how they need to play with nature.
Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening is just an entire poem at how the woods caught his eye and he wished to stay and admire it longer, people should react to nature this way all the time. Nature is fleeting in a world like todays, and Frost was noticing this during the time period when he wrote. With as much cities as there are, it is harder to experience the snowy woods on a late evening. People should make a point of...

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