The Affluent Society Essay

2284 words - 10 pages

The Affluent Society was written in 1958. A little information about Professor Galbraith, he was a Harvard economics professor. Served on many US president’s staffs as well as he were great writer. A lot of his theory is based on Keynesian economics. This book, The Affluent Society, is part of a trilogy. The book tackles the status of the US post World War II. It gives great insight into the political, economical as well as pop culture during the time. Each one of those areas is linked together to show the wealth gap that was beginning, that is now a huge problem in our society today. Instead of breaking down the book chapter by chapter, I would like to break down the book into vital areas that make the book what it is. It is extremely interesting how genius Prof. Galbraith is. To be able to research and connect the dots of these extreme and what seems “non relatable” subjects and make them relate in order convey a problem for us to see. Unfortunately, our country did not look at this serious enough. The book also shows a great deal of progress our country made in such little time. In the matter of a decade, the technical, social and political ups and downs of our society started this snowball effect that has now turned into modern day America.
One of the first major themes of the book deals with civil rights. The events that happen during this decade are what lead to the civil rights movement of the early 1960’s. Which eventually turned into the Civil Rights Act of 1965. When most people think about the civil rights, most people think of Martin Luther King Jr., Letter from Birmingham Jail, SLLC etc.
One thing The Affluent Society points out, this also gave rights to women. Even though the Act was passed, it took time to put them into use. But the ideas that sparked this Act among with countless other historically important facts came from this era. One prime example that I am sure not a lot of people know is that this Act helped millions of Mexican immigrants. During World War II, the bracero program brought in thousands of Mexican immigrants to work on farms while our men were at war. Once the war was over with, farmers were letting off these now illegal immigrants to pick up the soldiers for work. With now close to a million immigrants who help feed these soldiers as well as citizens are left to fend for themselves. There was a program called Operation Wetback that rounded up an estimated eighty thousand newly illegal immigrants in Texas and send them back to Mexico. Now this causes citizens to look at Mexicans, legal or non-legal, as bad people. That in turn hurts the ones that are legal citizens, to get jobs, get into certain schools as well as the same basic racial problems that the African Americans were facing.
One other thing that I mentioned earlier is that women were affected in a positive way by the civil rights movement. There was a forty percent jump in women in the workforce. At the time, one could think of this as social...

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