The Ages Of Poetry Essay

1175 words - 5 pages

     The English Romantic poets of the 19th Century had a conception about nature that, over a century later, appears in the poetry of today. These poets have had a significant influence on the attitude and vocabulary a contemporary poet uses. Among the contemporary poets, Dana Gioia, in his two poems, "Becoming a Redwood," and "Rough Country," has drawn on the idea of the innocence and untainted part of nature that parallels the Romantic poetry of William Wordsworth and William Blake in their poems "Nutting," and "The Tyger." Also, Gioia has captured the wild-like and untamable demeanor of nature that many English Romantics have similarly captured. Finally, Gioia uses the concept of the sublime in his poetry to the extent that nature becomes dangerous to humans.

     Many English Romantic poets have written about the innocent and purity that can be found in nature. In Wordsworth's "Nutting," he comments on the beauty of the innocence of an "unvisited" nook his character discovers. Wordsworth writes, "Unvisited, where not a broken bough / Drooped with its withered leaves, ungracious sign / Of devastation; but the hazels rose / tall and erect, with tempting clusters hung, / A virgin scene!" (Ln17-31) Wordsworth is commenting on the innocence and beauty of nature without human intrusion. This Romantic conception of innocence parallels Gioia in his poem "Rough Country." He writes, " a spot so hard to reach that no one comes-- / a hiding place, a shrine for dragonflies / and nesting jays, a sign that there is still / one piece of property that won't be owned." (17-20) This last line implies that this part of nature will remain untouched, this part of nature will remain pure and innocent, and a Romantic conception of nature that even Gioia has adopted in his poetry.

     Another conception that the English Romantics held about nature was that nature is wild and untamable. This wild-like aspect of nature is described in William Blake's "The Tyger." Blake writes, "Tyger, Tyger / Burning bright / In the forests of the night / What immortal hand or eye / Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?" (1-4) Blake creates this image of the Tyger as a wild beast, an untamable creature of the forest, and thereby composes nature the same way. Gioia in many ways parallels this view in his poems. In his poem "Rough Country," nature is viewed as "a place no engineers can master," (6)"a landscape made of obstacles / of steep hills and jutting glacial rock."(1-2) This nature Gioia describes is not sweet and delicate or fantastic; on the contrary, this attitude toward nature is fierce and ferine. The landscape of the nature in this rough country is not welcoming to human's tread, just as the "Tyger" in William Blake's poem would not be. In Gioia's...

Find Another Essay On The Ages Of Poetry

"The Seven Ages of Man" Essay

782 words - 4 pages “All the world’s a stage the men and women merely players”. This line is the beginning of the “The Seven Ages of Man” and is a recurring question throughout the poem. You may wonder how the world is stage, and through his use of similes, metaphors, and imagery Shakespeare explains this elaborates on this question. William Shakespeare’s use of similes in the “Seven Ages of Man” helps to start the poem and give it a meaning early on by adding

The Poetry of Giovanni Essay

2323 words - 9 pages of her first book of poetry, Black Feeling, Black Talk. She quickly gained popularity for her first collection and followed in the same year with the publication of Black Judgement. The unifying themes of the work are the black struggle and the role she sees for herself as both a participant in and a witness to the historic events of the Civil Rights movement.Giving a glimpse into the childhood of the poet is the poem "Nikki-Rosa," which

The Temperature of poetry

1577 words - 7 pages The Temperature of Poetry Poetry is one of the stranger parts of the literary world. A poem can be anything, from a three-lined poem known as a haiku to a giant epic poem like the “The Odyssey.” They can be rhyming or non-rhyming, long or short, sensible or nonsensical. Even lyrics in songs can be considered poetry, seeing as how they are rhyming and flow so well. The parameters for a poem are wide, the requirements few; but no matter what kind

The Art of Poetry

1314 words - 6 pages By analyzing “Ars Poetica” by Archibald MacLeish, I’ll gain a definition of a poem that can be used to analyze other piece of poetry. I start by looking at the layout of the poem. This poem is divided into three parts with four stanzas in each. This tells me that these sections could be read independently and interpreted separately from each other. The first section uses words relating to ‘quiet’ such as mute, dumb, silent, and wordless. The

The Forgotten Time of the Middle Ages

2177 words - 9 pages foundations of the field.” According to Grafton, in order to “appreciate the explosive impact of this reformation of historical chronology, we need to look backward”. He looked back to examine the chronology in fourth and fifth century C.E., in the fifth century B.C. Greek, and in the Romans of the late Republic and early Empire. However, Grafton did not look back to the Middle Ages which was the period between the collapse of the Western Roman

The Crusades of the High Middle Ages

1060 words - 4 pages The Crusades of the High Middle Ages The Crusades of the High Middle Ages (a.d. 1050-1300) was a period of conquest or rather, reconquest, of Christian lands taken from Muslims in the early Middle Ages. It is an era romanticized by fervent Christians as the time when Christianity secured its honorable status as the true religion of the world. The affect of the Crusades is still with us today. It sailed from Spain and Portugal to the

The Age of Faith: The Dark Ages

736 words - 3 pages From the fifth to the fifth teen century, Western Europe went through a period called the Age of Faith, also known as the “dark ages”. The church wanted more power and authority, and that implicated a few changes. Not only did the internal structure of the church change, but so did the external. Thus the Age of Faith was simulated, and encouraged battles and adventures. This age was influenced by many factors, such as the reforming of the

The Development of Liberalism down the Ages

1540 words - 7 pages   In this paper, an attempt has been made to capture the journey from classical liberalism and its transformation down the ages. The idea of liberalism originated in Europe with the thoughts of political philosophers like J.S. Mill, Herbert Spencer, John Locke. They were of the opinion that state activities can regulate an individual in so far as it aids towards his self expression and individual action. They also said that states were

Black Death of the Middle Ages

797 words - 4 pages quickly (Snell) During these tough times both hardship and misfortune where faced in the medieval ages. Daily life was occasionally exceedingly hard to fathom. Medicine was immensely limited, but some methods were tested in hopes of finding a secure lead to restoring health. That fact that there were no antibiotics during the middle ages is what turned the hard times into the absolute most difficult times. People suffered in agonizing pain

Role of Women in The Middle Ages

3083 words - 12 pages       The history of the Middle Ages is generally known through the recorded accomplishments of wealthy aristocratic men. The rigidly stratified social structure allowed little or no chance for advancement, especially for the very poor. Therefore, the voice of the poverty stricken masses goes unheard or is simply drowned out by the ruling class. However, beyond even the discontented whisper of the poor, another voice without even a breath to

Froissart: Reporter of the Middle Ages

1354 words - 5 pages Froissart: Reporter of the Middle AgesThe Chronicles written by Jean Froissart is a first hand account of life and society in the middle ages. In The Chronicles, Froissart documents many historical events from about 1322-1400. Two events reported in The Chronicles are the causes of the Hundred Years War and the Jacquerie Revolt. Many historians agree that Froissart's reporting of the Hundred Years War is accurate, but that his reporting of the

Similar Essays

Heroes Of The Ages Essay

1568 words - 6 pages Throughout the ages, there have been many epic heroes in which we hear about through stories. However, there is a rather common question of what makes them an epic hero. Not only do humans look for the bravery and good deeds in a hero, but they go deeper than that. They wish to know what lies beneath the skin. Literally, what makes them act the way they do. Psychologically speaking, there is no sure way to tell why each person acts the way they

Knights Of The Middle Ages Essay

3527 words - 14 pages and certain weapons, such as the bows became much more powerful. As a consequence of this, armours had to be improved as well. In Literature, the fine figure of the knight is exalted. His qualities and virtues are very well described in most of the romances and poetry of the Middle Ages. Enchanted forests and castles, gigantic creatures, supernatural elements, the use of magic and the detailed description of fantastic adventures

Warfare Of The Middle Ages Essay

1069 words - 5 pages A weapon is an extension of your body, it can be strong, fast, silent, deadly, powerful and much more. In medieval times weapons and armor such as swords and shields were all key parts in winning battles. The middle ages started after the Roman Empire fell in 476 by barbarians, and the Middle Ages took place in Europe. It started in the 5th century and ended in 15th century. The Middle Ages were dark and dangerous times full of war and many

Instruments Of The Middle Ages Essay

1317 words - 6 pages church to sing hymns. (“Medieval Music”). Many of the instruments from the Middle Ages we still have today or have a variation of a similar type of medieval instrument (“Musical Instruments”). The two broad categories of this day were outdoor and indoor instruments. The outdoor instruments were generally louder (trumpets), while the indoor instruments were softer and meant to be played indoors (lute) (Sporre 335). As time went on, musical