The Bluest Eye And A Perfect Society

842 words - 4 pages

In the novel The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, she exposes the suffering produced by the problems caused by gender and race oppression through the experiences of African-American children. During the 1940’s, the United States had composed an identity through mass media with books such as “Dick and Jane”, and movies like “Sherley Temple.” These media sources provided a society based on national innocence. In the novel, Morrison relates to and exposes the very real issues that were hidden by the idea of the stereotypical white middle-class family.
In the beginning of the novel, Morrison introduces the perfect family with the “Dick and Jane” reading style. The thought of the perfect family with ...view middle of the document...

Yacobowski. He looks through Pecola and treats her poorly by speaking to her disrespectfully and avoiding touching her hands. He “Does not see her, because for him there is nothing to see” (48). Pecola is used to not being recognized by other people. She sees it in the faces of all white people she has seen. Since Pecola is so weak mentally and very fragile, she becomes depressed and has the goal to be viewed by society differently. Pecola is a symbol of hopelessness and powerlessness of an adolescent African-American female. Since she is forgotten by society, the pain and emotions she feels are disregarded and forgotten by the blind eyes of society.
Pecola’s family also represents the history of racial persecution in American society during that time of history. During the 1940’s, when the novel takes place, husbands were the hard workers and the moms were the ones who were caring and loving. Pauline and Cholly clearly were not in the same category as that! The quote “But that old dog Breedlove had burned up his house, gone upside his wife’s head, and everybody, as a result, was outdoors.” (16) Shows Cholly is an angry and violent father who is incapable of displaying love. Pauline is very much the same way. They had become the way they are by the rejection and humiliation they had faced by whites in their society. Since Cholly had been turned away by his father and left by his...

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