The Chrysalids Essay

930 words - 4 pages

Today’s society is accepting of differences, where as in the Chrysalids if you had any type of difference that was visible, you didn’t get a certificate, you were sterilized and sent to the fringes. Conformity was the only way of having control over the people of the Waknuck society and they didn’t want mutants or deviations to take over. Another story about mutants is portrayed in the movie X-Men First Class, all the normal people are afraid of them. They are afraid because of what they can and could possible do and they had no way of controlling them without making them come out of hiding. They would have to tell the government what they could do and the government would then decide whether or not they were too dangerous for the public. The Waknuck society was not into have individualism, just like in the Hunger Games. In the movie people were separated into districts and every year to remind them of why they were separated, they have one male and one female from each district between the ages 12-18 as tributes. This happens because of the rebellion Seventy-four years before and every year all twenty-four tributes are to fight to the death until one lone victor remains. In the Chrysalids they are to keep to their jobs in their district and to report any deviants. They control conformity through and by historical beliefs, for example the only two book’s left from the “Old People” were the revised Bible to tell them what the true image really is and the book Repentances. Furthermore the Chrysalids is about how conformity after devastation may not be the greatest idea.
In the Hunger Games and Chrysalids the government can control the people in the districts by going back to a better time when it was simpler so they are easier to control. In the Hunger Games the government controlled the population by separating them by districts, twelve in total. In each district there were different type of resources, for example in district 12 they mine coal. In the Hunger Games and Chrysalids there was a great tribulation that caused the government to make the people have long term consequences. For both they had a large dispute were the government had to take in conformity as the result of the damage from the conflict. They also had certain rules or the consequences were very drastic and severe.
Waknuck as a society had put into the peoples who lived there the belief of a specific image of god, and if you don’t look like it by the simplest deformity you are not accepted. In Sealand they are only accepting of people who are...

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