The Damned Human Race Report And Response

672 words - 3 pages

Mark twain's essay "The damned human race" brings up the concept of human superiority on Earth and thoroughly questions it. "...now seems plain to me that the [Darwinian] theory ought to be vacated in favor of a new and truer one, this new and truer one to be named the Descent of Man from the Higher Animals", states the thesis of the paper, shaping up several main concerns that inspired Mark Twain to create the essay.As reported by Twain, his "experiments" in the London Zoo Garden outlined major points of his essay. First point listed was greed. "They killed seventy-two of those great animals; and ate part of one of them and left the seventy-one to rot", is Twain's description of man's hunting habits. Man wishes to take life for no reason except for joy and his own pleasure. On the other hand, "The grateful reptile immediately crushed one of them and swallowed it, then lay back satisfied", is the description of an anaconda, who only takes what it needs to survive, and nothing more. The author believes the anaconda example illustrates that the "man was descended from the anaconda, and had lost a good deal in the transition". As a follow up on the point of greed, the writer corresponds to another distinct habit of men - the desire to stock up excessively on anything they can get. A person who accumulated a billion dollars is as willing to have more, as is another person with a thousand billion, states Twain. While on the other hand, "The squirrels and bees and certain birds made accumulations, but stopped when they had gathered a winter s supply, and could not be persuaded to add to it either honestly or by chicane", which concludes the first point.Accoarding to the essay, another unique sin only applicable to men is violence to each other. A harem, something both animals and humans create, exemplifies the point. "Roosters keep harems,...

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