The Death Of Socrates By Jacques Louis David

522 words - 2 pages

By viewing the painting The Death of Socrates by Jacques-Louis David, Socrates’ loyalty to the Athenian government was far more important to him than his own death or friendship. He was more interested in teaching his students about his belief in reason and the law of justice before he died. Still, the students and friends were arguing with him and trying to convince him to renounce his teachings. Socrates was strong in telling his students how it was for the good of society that he drinks the poison hemlock. He was not going to change what he was teaching all along when he truly believed in the democratic Athenian government laws. Socrates’ loyalty to the government was much stronger than the ties of friendship or acquaintances.

In the painting, Socrates’ posture is very defiant. His left arm is upraised and firmly pointing. His right arm is more relaxed while he was looking away from the poison he was reaching for. Reaching for the cup was an afterthought and unimportant to him. Also, the chains were just lying on the floor. They were not being used to restrain him. No one was restraining him or forcing him to drink the poison. He is willfully reaching out for the cup. Everyone in the room was crying except for Socrates. The man that was handing the poison to Socrates could not even bear to look at Socrates’ face. The man is looking the opposite direction. His hand is covering his eyes. He almost looks ashamed to be handing...

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