The Dystopian Society Of Brave New World, By Aldous Huxley

1416 words - 6 pages

A dystopia is an imaginary, imperfect place where those who dwell are faced with terrible circumstances. The novel Brave New World by Aldous Huxley illustrates the concept of a dystopia. A utopia is an ideal place where everything is perfect, but in the novel, it becomes apparent that the author is trying to demonstrate the negative effects on a society when it attempts to become an unreachable utopian society. Brave New World is seen as a dystopia for many reasons, as citizens are deprived of freedom, programmed to be emotionless and under the control of a corrupt dictatorship. These points illustrate the irony of a society’s attempt to reach utopia by opposing ethics and morality; citizens are tragically distanced from paradise, leading to the creation of a dystopia. Even though the society portrayed in the novel could be seen as perfect, many flaws exist within it, which results in it being a dystopia.
The removal of freedom suppresses citizens’ fantasy, thereby depriving each citizen of his/her idealistic utopia. For instance, people are medically created to suit the needs which society faces. Humans are being created by the bokanovsky process, where they are repeatedly cloned which eliminates any individuality people may have, as they are all forced to be similar. The use of the bokanovsky process takes out any meaning which a person being born originally had, making it just another experiment conducted to help the greater good. “One egg, one embryo, one adult-normality. But a bokanovskified egg will bud, will proliferate, will divide. From eight to ninety-six buds, and every bud will grow into a perfectly formed embryo, and every embryo into a full-sized adult. Making ninety-six human beings grow where only one grew before” (Huxley 3-4). This excerpt from the novel clearly indicates the society’s cold expression towards the creation of human life as humans are formed at convenient times only, using the most productive method to achieve the maximum overall benefit. Furthermore, as humans are created they are put into the caste system from birth where they have no choice but to go along with their predetermined fate. From when they are just eggs they go through various treatment such as heavy dosing with alcohol which limit them to what there are mentally and physically capable of doing. As people are separated into their individual groups, they lose any hope in achieving advancement, resulting in them being constricted to their caste for the rest of their life. In addition, people are required to be happy with the current state of their lives at all times. This creates many problems, as they do not experience anything, but the illusion of happiness, which is forced upon them. It is stated in the novel “No social stability without individual stability” (Huxley 36); this philosophy ironically indicates that the requirement to be content would cause citizens to be unstable due to lack of other feelings which would result in the eventual...

Find Another Essay On The Dystopian Society of Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

1674 words - 7 pages Brave New World Analysis 1/3 1) One of the biggest conflicts witnessed so far in the first 90 pages of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is the internal one within the main protagonist, Bernard Marx. Throughout the book, Bernard encounters a violent conflict within himself. He was born different from everyone else, and he finds himself many times questioning the system, he feels that there is much more to be/accomplish in life than just having

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

1181 words - 5 pages Brave New World, a novel written by Aldous Huxley, can be compared and contrasted with an episode of The Twilight Zone, a fantasy, science-fiction television series, called “Number 12 Looks Just Like You.” Brave New World is a highly regarded and renowned work of literature as The Twilight Zone is considered one of the greatest television series of all time. Brave New World and The Twilight Zone’s episode “Number 12 Looks Just Like You” can be

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

840 words - 4 pages him. However due to his alienation he is unable to take upon this action and remains filled with knowledge and morality about the truth of the World State that he despises. Bernard the protagonist of "Brave New World" written by Aldous Huxley is a character alienated from society because the other Alphas do not accept him due to the rumors people made up that claimed alcohol was in his blood surrogate. However as Edward Said wrote, "exile can

Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

891 words - 4 pages unpredictable. By removing disease, war, famine, and the like, the world government has a greater sense of control. By promoting the three principles the Controllers have created a situation that they believe is a happy, utopian society. Works Cited Brave New World Aldous Huxley

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

1618 words - 6 pages Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Brave New World, a novel by Aldous Huxley was written at a tine in history when war had ravaged much of the nation, Depression was blanketing society, and people’s wills were being put to the test. Science had become an overwhelming force for better or for worse. People had witnessed science saving and preventing millions of lives with vaccinations and such, but on the contrary, had also witnessed it kill

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - 760 words

760 words - 3 pages Aldous Huxley saw problems with the world, and he wrote a novel about a fictional solution. In his novel, Brave New World, people of the distant future are part of a radical new society. the planners of this utopic system of social organization seek to abolish inequalities among humans, social unrest, war, unhappiness, and the miserable human condition. Although this utopia is set hundreds of years into the future, it contains elements of our

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - 871 words

871 words - 3 pages conflict either Communist or Communist-controlled, (at one instance a character refers to his friend as “Comrade”). Threats of a totalitarian communist based government were a huge concern of George Orwell. Aldous Huxley Utopia does not have a particular basis to ground it in, so therefore it is more likely than 1984 to happen in the present or near future. The society shown in Brave New World has more of an opportunity to arise in modern times

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - 1397 words

1397 words - 6 pages allows these view to shine as illustrated by John’s infatuation with this new world, his dissatisfaction and isolation, and finally his eventual suicide. The World State powerful ideals are expressed through the use of significant relationship, high art, and true raw human emotion and a higher religious power. John’s wide and different character portrayal is the key to establishing the world state as a dystopia and the overarching flaws of society. Works Cited Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: Harper & Bros., 1946. Print.

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley

1988 words - 8 pages Brave New WorldSociety is made up of the morals and beliefs of man intertwined with the foggy nature of science. However, science and society do not necessarily mix. In the book, "Brave New World," by Aldous Huxley, a world without emotion and human nature is created in order to fit a perfect caste system within society. The name of this society is the World State and it is powered by engineers, scientists, and counselors that control the

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley

1123 words - 4 pages The society in "Brave New World", by Aldous Huxley, is exceptionally different from society today. Acts that are accepted in today's society are frowned upon in the society Huxley creates, such as, worshipping God, and marriage. Science and technology rule the society in Brave New World, and due to this, society is incredibly efficient and productive. One might see the society in Brave New World as improved and beneficial, but despite the

Brave New World (By: Aldous Huxley)

1278 words - 5 pages .... FREEDOM IS SLAVERY... IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH.." (Orwell). The outcome of censored messages was to make citizens unaware of the current situation, and also to make Oceana seem more powerful. Similarly in Brave New World, the Bokanovsky's process insured the government that different races of kids would be created to perform various tasks in society. Before even conception, embryos were classified by race and intelligence level. From here, they had a pre

Similar Essays

"The Brave New World" By Aldous Huxley

961 words - 4 pages This is just a : Do you want to live in this world essay.The Brave New WorldIn The Brave New World, their society is unique compared to the reality that I live in. They may have many advantages and disadvantages if it is compared to our society. Brave New World's utopia would be nice to have in our society. Having to place myself in their world would never happen. I do not think living in the utopia of brave new world would suit me.Living in

The Use Of Technology To Control Society In Brave New World, By Aldous Huxley

1468 words - 6 pages Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley, portrays a future society where people are no longer individuals but are controlled by the World State. The World State dominates the people by creating citizens that are content with who they are. Brave New World describes how the science of biology and psychology are manipulated so that the government can develop technologies to change the way humans think and act. The World State designs humans from

Dystopian Society Explored In A Clockwork Orange, By Anthony Burgess And Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

1672 words - 7 pages Deprived Identity A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley are both novels that deal with the theme of dystopia. Both novels depict societies in which mind control is used to create social stability. There are also individuals who rebel against this loss of freedom and identity. However, these individuals lose their fight for freedom because of unsuccessful escape methods, acts of violence and effective

Brave New World, By Aldous Huxley

1854 words - 8 pages In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, a haunting warning of a possible future for the world is presented to readers. The novel’s world is composed of dystopian strata plagued by a dependence on drugs, technology, and a well-defined social class system. Huxley’s uncanny foresight specific to segregation and social class strata is startling because readers do not expect to find aspects of Brave New World’s segregation and class structure in modern