The Maturity Of Jane Eyre In Charlotte Bronte's Novel

2584 words - 10 pages

In Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, it was love, and not age or education, that led Jane to mature and grow as a person. With the help of Helen Burns and Miss. Temple, Jane Eyre learned what it meant to love someone. Both these people influenced Jane to mature into a young lady by showing Jane their love and affection. When Jane left Lowood to become a governess, she met the love of her life, Mr. Rochester. With his love, Jane Eyre eventually matured fully and grew into a self-sufficient woman and left the hatred and anger behind.
As a child, Jane Eyre suffered from much torment from her Aunt Reed and her callous cousins. She never received the love she deserved and longed for. She felt the need to escape from the misery and torture that she got at Gateshead from her so called family. In a way, Mrs. Reed helped Jane in her process of growing and maturing. Jane was determined to find something better for her in life because she did not want to feel that rejection from the Reeds. With that rejection, Jane was motivated to become someone better than they were. Jane Eyre was sent to Lowood, an orphanage school, and met Miss Temple and Helen Burns.
Miss Temple was the first amiable person that Jane Eyre met at Lowood Institution. She acted as a firm role model and mentor to Jane throughout her stay at Lowood as a superintendent. Jane Eyre, a simple young girl, was astonished by her character because she never had a person to look up to until she met Miss Temple. Miss Temple gave Jane that sense of love that she wanted when she arrived at Lowood. She was incapable of being harsh to those girls at the institute; she had no bad bone in her body.
Miss Temple is full of goodness; it pains her to be severe to any one, even the worst in the school: she sees my errors, and tells me of them gently; and, if I do anything worthy of praise, she gives me my meed liberally. One strong proof of my wretchedly defective nature is, that even her expostulations, so mild, so rational, have not influence to cure me of my faults; and even her praise, though I value it most highly, cannot stimulate me to continued care and foresight (Bronte 60).
Miss Temple was a motherly figure to Jane Eyre, the figure that she never had. She was always very loving and compassionate to both Helen and Jane and to the rest of the girls in the institute. Miss Temple showed Jane some good qualities such as the way that one should be treated. Jane was accused of being a liar because of a canard, but Miss Temple wanted to prove her innocence. She knew Jane was not a liar and wanted justice to be seen. When Helen got mistreated by Miss Scatcherd, Jane noticed how Miss Temple was different and treated people with respect and dignity. Jane aspired to have the same qualities that Miss Temple had one day.
Helen Burns, Jane’s best friend, was hated by Miss Scatcherd from Lowood, but Helen remained silent and respectful. The teacher was captious and would blame Helen for any little thing. Jane did...

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