The No Child Left Behind Act Of 2001

3364 words - 13 pages

On January 8, 2002, President George Bush signed into law The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which was a reauthorization of Elementary and Secondary Education Act, which was designed to help disadvantaged students achieve success in school (Editorial Projects in Education Research Center, 2011) The components of The No Child Left Behind included annual testing, academic progress, report cards, teacher qualifications, and funding changes. These measures were “designed to drive broad gains in student achievement and to hold states and schools more accountable for student progress” (Editorial Projects in Education Research Center, 2011, para. 3). NCLB also promised to close the achievement gap and increase student learning (Hursh 2007).
By the year 2005-2006, the states were required to assess all students annually in grades 3-8, and these tests had to be aligned with the state standards (Editorial Projects in Education Research Center, 2011). In addition, a representative sample of 4th graders and 8th graders had to participate in National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) testing program in order to be compared to other students nationally (Editorial Projects in Education Research Center, 2011). For a school to meet academic progress, certain subgroups and the school has a whole had to make adequate yearly progress. If the school failed to make AYP, then the school could receive supplemental services and parents could send their children to another school. If the school continued to not make AYP, then the school could receive punitive government sanctions. Teachers had to be deemed highly qualified in their subject matter, and school report cards had to be released each year to illustrate student achievement data and school-by school comparison (Editorial Projects in Education Research Center, 2011). Lastly, there were funding changes that altered the formula for Title I; this alteration led to more funding being available for students that had higher concentrations of economically disadvantaged children (Editorial Projects in Education Research Center, 2011).
The emphasis on high-stakes testing as a result of NCLB has led to a widening of the achievement gap, as African-American males are compared to other demographics. NCLB prompted schools to focus more on remedial instruction and test-taking strategies. Consequently, educators had to “shift resources away from important but non-tested subjects”, such as art, physical education, and music, and “to focus instruction in math and reading on the relatively narrow topics that are most heavily represented on high-stakes tests” (Dee and Jacob, 2011, p. 418). Furthermore, instructional effort was reallocated away from the high-performing and low- performing standards, which lead to more instructional emphasis on students who were more likely to achieve proficiency on benchmarks and state assessments (Dee and Jacob, 2011). The effect of NCLB was very deleterious to African-American males. ...

Find Another Essay On The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

The No Child Left Behind Act

1441 words - 6 pages Initiated in 2002, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001 intended to prevent the academic failures of educational institutions and individual students, as well as bridge achievement gaps between students. This act supports the basic standards of education reform across America; desiring to improve the learning outcomes of America’s youth. No Child Left Behind has left many to criticize the outcomes of the Act itself. Questions have risen

The No Child Left Behind Act

1108 words - 4 pages The No Child Left Behind Act Education has changed a lot in the past few years. Most significant of all changes has been the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act set up by President Bush in 2001. The NCLB Act was established to help close the education gap in public schools. Students from every background have been and are currently affected by NCLB, as well as are teachers. The standards have been set, and the race has begun

The No Child Left Behind Act

2529 words - 10 pages Introduction to this Paper The No Child Left Behind Act has stacked the deck against schools with special needs. At this point in time with the 2004 elections right around the corner, it seems that this Act is taking a lot of criticism for it’s rigid approach to the educational progress of our children today. No Child Left Behind has some wonderful goals and aspirations: to “close the student achievement gap, make public schools accountable

No child left behind act

1201 words - 5 pages The No child left behind act has been a big issues ever since its establishment in 2009 by President George Bush. There has been cry by some parents for the law to be repeal because they feel it is creating more problem for the educational system. However, critical analysis of the situation of the students grades by comparing the period before and after the establishment of No child left behind will show that the law has brought tremendous

No Child Left Behind Act

2004 words - 8 pages determined by the location of the school and the type of school, whether private, public, or charter.  The current issues in education of particular concern to me are the No Child Left Behind Act, school financing, and bullying. Effective in 2001, the No Child Left Behind Act was proposed to nationally and annually test all children under the same conditions and with the same test to prevent students from being trapped in a failing school.  Other

no child left behind act

2208 words - 9 pages . even if a couple of of those job are settled, several still stay. These problems square measure determined by the localisation of the college time and also the case of faculty, whether or not non-public, public, or charter. The stream problems in education of explicit vexation to Pine Tree State square measure the No Nestling Left field Behind Deed , faculty funding, and bullying Effective in 2001, the No fry Left Behind act was planned to across

No child left behind act

572 words - 2 pages Since the leave no child behind act more school districts are beginning to provide programs for their students who have special needs. This case study is about children who are mentally retarded being included in regular classes in high school. This research was taken with the financial help of the Centre de re`adaptation Lisette-Dupras, the Education Department at University` du Que`bec a` Montreal, the foundation quefecoise de las

The Benefits of No Child Left Behind

2612 words - 10 pages Publication Center This book is a comprehensive guide for parents about the issues of early adolescence. This is part of the NCLB agenda, to keep parents involved in the schools. Guthrie, J.W. No child left behind act of 2001. Encyclopedia of Education. Ed. James W. Guthrie. Vol. 5. 2nd ed. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2002. 1801-1803. 8 vols. Retrieved November 28, 2004 from Gale virtual library reference This encyclopedia

The Debate Over the No Child Left Behind Act

1163 words - 5 pages The current debates surrounding the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 are both positive and negative. Many politicians and people that previously supported the Act are now standing against it. In the beginning many supported the new Act because everyone was aware that a change needed to happen in the education system and the proposal of No Child Left Behind seemed like the answer we were looking for. As the No Child Left Behind requirements

Inequality of Education: No Child Left Behind Act

948 words - 4 pages their education now are appalling because of all the negative feedback that the act provides for most school districts because all the students’ different learning abilities show lower test scores in standardized testing. The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) was passed in 2001 for aiding the development of education from 2001-2014 by creating standardized testing in hopes of creating more intelligent children, but there are more children left

Pros and Cons of No Child Left Behind Act

651 words - 3 pages On January 8, 2002, President Bush signed into law the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). This law represents his education reform plan and contains changes to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) since it was enacted in 1965. It is asking America's schools to describe their success in terms of what each student accomplishes. The act contains the President's four basic education reform principles: stronger accountability for

Similar Essays

The No Child Left Behind Act Of 2001

1989 words - 8 pages The No Child Left Behind act of 2001 Control of the public education system has been left to the State for most of the country’s history, it was not until the 1950’s that the federal government played a role in categorical programs, but the national government refrained from involvement in academics until the 90’s. Three days after taking up his position in office, George Bush announced his plan for the No Child Left Behind act (NCLB) which was

No Child Left Behind Act 2001

1199 words - 5 pages The No Child Left Behind Act:A Review of the Current Education ReformationThe No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001, signed into law by President George W. Bush, was created to close the achievement gap and ensure that every student attains proficiency in reading and mathematics. NCLB uses federal funds to encourage schools and school districts to comply with the Act. NCLB was intended to reform education through four pillars. These include

The No Child Left Behind Act

681 words - 3 pages President George W. Bush originally proposed the No Child Left Behind Act in the year 2001. The No Child Left Behind Act is geared towards public schools. It required the public schools to do more standardized testing and penalized schools whose students scored below benchmarks. President Bush considered the No Child Left Behind Act a close to home project. While he was the governor of Texas he renewed a law giving schools in Texas more

The No Child Left Behind Act

2537 words - 10 pages The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 Education is the foundation upon which all people grow intellectually, emotionally and socially. American education developed from European intellectual traditions and institutions brought into the New World and continued with modifications and improvements (Foner and Garrataly). Since before the Revolutionary War, America has had a long tradition of considering education as one of the cornerstones of