The Role Of Nigerian Women In The Workplace

1189 words - 5 pages

The Federal Republic of Nigeria is a federal constitutional republic comprising thirty-six states and its Federal Capital Territory, Abuja. “Nigeria is composed of three large ethnic groups – the Hausa-Fulani, Yoruba, and Igbo-who represent 70 percent of the population. Another 10 percent comprises of several other groups numbering more than 1 million members each, including the Kanuri, Tiv, and Ibibio. More than 300 smaller ethnic groups account for the remaining 20 percent of the population” (Federal Republic of Nigeria, 2012). In 2012, a census reported the population demographics of Nigeria of 85,420,192 men and 84,703,548 women (Index Mundi, 2012). Trade is a very large part of the Nigerian economy, with the United States’ being its number one trading partner. Dominated by oil and other natural resources, this excessive trade, and overall population sustainability, demands a workforce. Despite this workforce need, however, Nigeria suffers from a growing national unemployment rate of around 20 percent, with women having an overall 24.9 percent unemployment rate (National Bureau of Statistics, 2010). Women have the highest unemployment rate as opposed to men in Nigeria. This is accountable to several factors of Nigerian culture, representation by Geert Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions of power distance, masculinity/femininity, and uncertainty avoidance, which are a source of this culture influence. Covering the three aforementioned dimensions will attribute how Nigerian culture has shaped the country to its past and present masculine-dominated state, and give insight to how women play a role in the economy. In addition, providing a video interview from a Nigerian female, Akaninyene Umo, who has experience living in a poor city of Surulere, Lagos, and a rich city and capital, Port Harcourt, of River City, Nigeria, offers a real life experience to the role of women in the workplace. (Umo, 2013)
The evolution of women in Nigeria as continuously evolved since the independence of Nigeria in 1960. In the precolonial period, women played a major role in social and economic activities. Women controlled occupations such as food processing, mat weaving, pottery making, and cooking; all of which focused on the agricultural sector of employment (Falola, 2013). “The most serious threat to the influence and privileges of women occurred during the 20th century, when patriarchy combined with colonial changes to alter gender relations. As male chiefs collaborated with the British colonial administration in collecting taxes and governing, the position of female chiefs declined in importance. When the economy became increasingly geared toward the production of cash crops for export, Nigerian men and European firms dominated the distribution of rubber, cocoa, groundnuts (peanuts), and palm oil. Women, pushed to the background, were forced to shift to the production of subsistence crops” (Falola, 2013). Even though women have definitely come a long way in regards...

Find Another Essay On The Role of Nigerian Women in the Workplace

Women in the Workplace Essay

2679 words - 11 pages aspects of our society, women are now expected to compete with their male counterparts. Currently, it is not uncommon to hear of a women CEO or Vice President in businesses or even a women politician. Women have now emerged from laundry rooms and kitchens across the country and changed the demographics of the American workforce. However women are yet to take the medical workplace by storm and redefine the preconceived notions society upholds about

The Inequality of Women in the Workplace

2399 words - 10 pages For generations, the traditional role of women in society has almost entirely excluded them from participation in the workforce. Oppression against women, especially of colour, in the workforce is a serious issue in society. This issue began very long ago in history and sadly is still an issue in today. The rise of feminism, however, has impacted this issue greatly. Discrimination has been a serious part of this ongoing oppression in the

Status of Women in the Workplace

2626 words - 11 pages droves. However, in addition to simply flooding women into the workforce to account for the deficit of male workers following the War, the groundbreaking 1950s presented women as a sustainable source of labor. The greater gender diversity in the workforce would redefine the so-called entrenched gender role structure that for centuries had existed in society and, thus, the workplace. It was obvious that the nature of work was changed forever. But what

The Role of Women in the Church

1767 words - 7 pages With the advent of the feminist movement, the role of women inall parts of society has come under increasing scrutiny. One area ofrecent controversy is the role of women in the Christian Church. Somechurches whose traditions and practices are less rigidly tied toBiblical doctrines have begun placing women in leadership positionssuch as pastor or teacher. Other churches which interpret the Biblemore literally have been slow to adopt such changes

The Role of Women in the Church

1945 words - 8 pages Did a ton of reading and a lot of background stuff for thisThe Role of Women in the ChurchWith the advent of the feminist movement, the role of women in all parts of society has come under increasing scrutiny. One area of recent controversy is the role of women in the Christian Church. Some churches whose traditions and practices are less rigidly tied to Biblical doctrines have begun placing women in leadership positions such as pastor or

The Role of Women in the Church

1916 words - 8 pages With the advent of the feminist movement, the role of women in all parts of society has come under increasing scrutiny. One area of recent controversy is the role of women in the Christian Church. Some churches whose traditions and practices are less rigidly tied toBiblical doctrines have begun placing women in leadership positions such as pastor or teacher. Other churches which interpret the Bible more literally have been slow to adopt such

The Role of Women in the Church - 1850 words

1850 words - 7 pages The Role of Women in the ChurchWith the advent of the feminist movement, the role of women in all parts of society has come under increasing scrutiny. Onearea of recent controversy is the role of women in the Christian Church. Some churches whose traditions and practices are lessrigidly tied to Biblical doctrines have begun placing women in leadership positions such as pastor or teacher. Other churcheswhich interpret the Bible more literally

The role of women in the odyss

1246 words - 5 pages Homer wrote the classic epic The Odyssey more than 2,500 years ago. At that time in ancient Greek society, as well as in the whole of the ancient world, the dominant role was played by men. Society was organized, directed, and controlled by men, and it was accepted that women occupied a subservient and inferior position. Women, of course, were valued, but were expected to possess certain traits and perform certain tasks that men demanded of them

The role of women in the odyss

1246 words - 5 pages Homer wrote the classic epic The Odyssey more than 2,500 years ago. At that time in ancient Greek society, as well as in the whole of the ancient world, the dominant role was played by men. Society was organized, directed, and controlled by men, and it was accepted that women occupied a subservient and inferior position. Women, of course, were valued, but were expected to possess certain traits and perform certain tasks that men demanded of them

The Role Of Women in the Renaissance

1718 words - 7 pages civilization as it is known today. The era saw the birth of new attitudes concerning the role of man in his relationship to the world and to God. Unfortunately, for the most part, the expansion of the 'role of man' did not include the role of women. "Renaissance (from the French for "rebirth") is a term coined in the nineteenth century originally to denote the revival of art and letters under the influence of ancient Roman and Greek models

The Role of Women

981 words - 4 pages Women in Western Europe and Japan compare and contrast religiously, politically, and economically. Religiously, women in Western Europe were better off with the advantage of becoming a nun than women in Japan were who lost their role in Buddhist and Shintu rituals. Politically, feminist thinkers were allowing women to have a greater say politically but there were fewer female rulers or regents in Europe. Japan who had female empresses prior to

Similar Essays

Women In The Workplace Essay

1441 words - 6 pages Women in The Workplace Initially, the first women entering the workplace did so out of desire. In a post feminist, post-civil right era and spurred on by higher levels of education. Women saw jobs and careers as rights that had previously been denied to them. Women were tired of just being "Big Johns Wife" or "Little Johnny's mommy". They wanted to be known the way men have always identified themselves by their jobs, their careers, and

Women In The Workplace Essay

1246 words - 5 pages Women in the Workplace All over the world, patriarchy controls and dictates the way society works. Every day stories are told of women in third-world countries who have fallen victim to said patriarchy. These women seem distant from people who live in the first-world, causing many to think that patriarchy is not present in more advanced cultures. However, they could not be more wrong. It encompasses almost every aspect of western life. Even in

Women In The Workplace Essay

2057 words - 8 pages The "glass ceiling" has held women back from certain positions and opportunities in the workplace. Women are stereotyped as part-time, lower-grade workers with limited opportunities for training and advancement because of this "glass ceiling". How have women managed their careers when confronted by this glass ceiling? It has been difficult; American women have struggled for their role in society since 1848. Women’s roles

Women In The Workplace Essay

2373 words - 9 pages Women in The Workplace Gender plays a huge role in workplace 'success' and can be a big challenge especially if the employee is a woman in a male dominated workplace or career. No matter how 'hard-nosed,' 'ruthless,' 'workaholic' a woman may be, or how much personal success she achieves, there will always tend to be some type of obstacle to keep her from getting completely to the top of the corporate ladder. She must also still