The Role Of Women In Afghanistan During Reconstruction.

786 words - 3 pages

Ever since the Soviet Union left Afghanistan in 1980, the country has been alone with no true government to face over 23 years of civil war. In 1994, the Taliban took control of the nation, but after supporting terrorism and Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda network, they too were removed from power in the year 2001. Meetings were held in Bonn, Germany to decide the future of Afghanistan. International representatives created The Afghan Interim Administration (AIA) to temporarily be in control, while a Loya Jirga would be assembled to create a more permanent government over the next two years. Not only is Afghanistan starting from scratch politically, but since the overthrow of the Taliban, opium production has skyrocketed (damaging other economic projects), relations with neighbors has suffered due to the millions of Afghan refugees that have been living in Pakistan and Iran for years, and foreign security forces have been brought in as there is no national army or police force in existence.The most dramatic change since the Taliban is the role of women in society. From 1994-2001, women were banned from walking outside their homes without being accompanied by a male relative, denied education and medical treatment, forced to give up jobs as teachers, doctors, and government workers; and forced to comply to an extremely restrictive dress code. After the Taliban, most of these rights have legally been returned to women, but they are still facing an uphill battle. With the creation of the AIA, two women have been appointed to help in rebuilding the nation (as the Minister of Women's Affairs and the Minister of Public Health). This is a step in the right direction, but these women are still overshadowed by the voice of the numerous warlords that have much more influence in politics. At this time, creating a lasting government and a stable economy are of the utmost importance to Afghanistan, but all efforts will be useless until women are fully integrated in society once again.Currently, women are allowed to return to school, travel freely, receive health care, and refrain from wearing a burqa, but many have kept with the old ways. The schools have been damaged in the U.S. and Northern Alliance's bombing campaign to eradicate terrorism, and lack teachers, books, and other technology. Although women may go outside...

Find Another Essay On The role of women in afghanistan during reconstruction.

Outline in detail the role and impact of three organisations that women were heavily involved in during world war one

992 words - 4 pages During World War One (1914-1918) there were many organisations that women were involved in and these organisations greatly contributed to the war effort. The women of World War One were heavily involved in keeping the home front operational whilst the men were away fighting the war. Three major organisations that the women of World War One were involved in were The Women's Land Army, The Order of the White Feather and The Women's Peace

How Did the Role of Women Change during the Years Surrounding World War One?

2231 words - 9 pages , and in 1921 the percentage of British women in the labor force was 2% less than in 1911.' This was definitely a setback for women in Britain, but it did not stop their pressure on the Governments to get their rights. "The Sex Disqualification Act of 1919 made it illegal to exclude women from jobs because of their gender." This was a huge deal because before the war, women were getting turned away from jobs because of their gender. The role of

Australia during World War 2: Wartime government controls and the changing role of women

1535 words - 6 pages injuries preventing them from fighting which also lead to an increase in demand for Australian troops.Changing Role of WomenThe role of women in Australia dramatically changed in the 2nd world war. Women's roles changed for several reasons and these changes generally had a positive effect on the lives of Australian women. Women were enthusiastic in volunteering their service to help Australia in the war. Women's lives were also affected during the

Gender Expectations and Women´s Role During the Elizabethan Era

1198 words - 5 pages Introduction Gender expectations limited personal choice to a great extent during the Elizabethan Era. The Elizabethan Era was the period in which Elizabeth I ruled England from 1558-1603. There was a strong view on women should be the property of men and must obey them. William Shakespeare influenced this time period massively and incorporated the different gender roles and expectations into his plays. Personal is defined as something

To What Extent Did Women Play a Role in America’s Industry during World War II

1727 words - 7 pages A. Plan Of Investigation: The question investigated was, to what extent did women play a role in America’s industry during World War II. During World War II men began getting drafted and leaving home to go defend their country, by doing so they not only left their families behind but their jobs as well. In order to keep production and the economy moving, women began to replace the men and become part of the work field. The scope of this

The Harsh Treatment of Women in Afghanistan

585 words - 2 pages The Harsh Treatment of Women in Afghanistan Since the tragedies of September 11th 2001, Americans have really opened their eyes to the political state of Afghanistan. The poor treatment of women in Afghanistan is an issue that, for many Americans, just seems to be coming to light as a serious concern that requires outside attention. Extreme Islamic leaders in the country persist in limiting the freedom that Afghan women have. Women in

Immigration patterns of the United States. This essay deals with the the role of women, labor conditions, and the growth of labor unions during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century

627 words - 3 pages union would get a more positive response if it embodied only skilled workers. The labor unions of the late nineteenth century were not very successful because of those sorts of disagreements.Women played a large role in society, many got jobs in the mills or factories as well as having to care for their children. They generally worked in textile factories, mills, sweatshops, and sometimes even in coal mines. Sometimes women would buy houses and

The Women of Afghanistan

1021 words - 4 pages Today in the United States, freedom is taken for granted by almost all citizens. People think that because of the way our government is structured, not having freedom will never be an issue. This thought of peace and safety was similar to that of the women in Afghanistan prior to the Taliban reign, and before the government in Afghanistan was overthrown. Their fortunes would change in 1996 when the Taliban ended up controlling Afghanistan, and

Women in Afghanistan

1699 words - 7 pages and the family obligations of men. They emerged from the ethnically Pashtun areas of Afghanistan. The Taliban ruled by installing the Islamic Law. Many of the leaders of the Taliban were scholars in Islam, with experience in government, so they led the country of Afghanistan with great authority. Taliban and Women: During the rule of the Taliban, Afghanistan was one of the poorest nations in the world, this caused the country nearly

Women in Afghanistan

740 words - 3 pages Women in Afghanistan The Taliban group is a group of men who formed in 1994 in the country of Kandahar by Islamic students who took an approach to interpreting Islam. The Group also believes in strict Islamic rules. According to them the men must have beards four fingers in length, there shall be no music and women should not be allowed to do anything other than stay home and watch the children and clean the house. This Taliban

The Role of Women in the Church

1767 words - 7 pages keep in mind this roledistinction.Lets examine the public ministry of women in the Church. Twomajor passages give specific instructions regarding women duringworship in the letters of the Apostle Paul. These two passages areused frequently when denying women a public role in church life. Thefirst is in I Corinthians chapter 14 verses 33 - 35, this passagecommands women to be silent during worship service. Similarly but withmore details, I Timothy

Similar Essays

Role Of Women In Business In Afghanistan

2108 words - 8 pages Years of war, lack of security and traditional believes have decreased Afghan women’s role in the Afghan Society substantially. The role of women in Afghanistan is very trivial and it is visible specifically in the business environment. The Afghan society doesn’t consent a woman entering the world of business and find her position in this world. It is based on some believes that a woman should stay at home and never speak about business. It is

Role Of The United States Supreme Court In Obtaining Equality For Blacks During Reconstruction

1595 words - 6 pages The role played by the United States' Supreme Court in obtaining equality for Black Americans was one of immense stature. The Supreme Court is the court that can only consider federal questions, or anything to do with federal law. Since obtaining equality for Blacks was such a trivial process and the legislation that was involved was open to much interpretation, much responsibility rested with the Supreme Court from 1896 to 1996 in determining

Women And Industry: The Role Of Women During World War Two In Ontario, Canada, 1939 45

1629 words - 7 pages , while married women were encouraged to contribute to the war effort through volunteer organizations that helped the war effort. The majority of married women did not abide by social conformity, many did go out and get jobs during World War Two. The demand on women to go and find work appeared to be hitting all regions of Canada. In a release of the Hamilton Spectator in August 12, 1943 there was an article directed at women about the Canadian

The Role Of Women Before And During World War I

1546 words - 7 pages From having no influence in society to being a large part of the modern day, women have evolved alongside the ever changing culture they live in. The change was not always accepted by society and women felt the pressure to not develop their roles from the men and women who were not in favor of change. The change in women’s roles was visible in stories that were read during the year. The roles of women that are evident in the plays A Doll’s House