The Self Confidence Of Jane In Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

642 words - 3 pages

In the Webster's online dictionary, self-confidence is defined as confidence in oneself and in one's powers and abilities.  A famous quote by Jim Loehr says, "With confidence, you can reach truly amazing heights; Without confidence, even the simplest accomplishments are beyond your grasp."  Confidence in yourself does not come without effort.  One must believe in themselves, and not let someone change their beliefs.  In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Jane shows self-confidence throughout the novel, by possessing a sense of self-worth, dignity, and a trust in God.

    At the beginning of the novel while Jane is living under her aunt, Mrs. Reed, she is treated disrespectfully and cruelly.  She accuses Jane of being deceitful and a troublesome girl in front of Mr. Brocklehurst, the master of Lowood School.  Jane is so hurt by this accusation that she cannot stop herself from defending her well being, and she stands up to her aunt.  She knows she is being treated disrespectful and has much more self-worth than what she was given credit for.  Therefore, with all that anger built up inside her she was able to gain the confidence to stand up to her aunt.  One could say at Gateshead was the beginning of her self-confidence, but even there it was sometimes weak and she would not stand up for herself.  As the novel goes on, and Jane encounters the next stages of her life, that is where her self-confidence really starts to shine and grow. 

 

 

    While Jane is attending Lowood School, which she finds out it is a charity school maintained for female orphans, she befriends a girl named Helen Burns.  Jane looks up to Helen, and because of her it helps Jane keep her self-confidence and even make it stronger.  Helen is treated unfairly, but because she possessed...

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