Varying Interpretations Of Helen Essay

760 words - 4 pages

Within the poem The Iliad, written by Homer, there are several tales of the epic battles waged between the men of Greece and Troy. These men fought constantly for ten years. A person might think that a battle that could continue for that amount of time may be about a difference of religion, or perhaps because a king wanted to acquire more land. No, this war was fought for one thing, a woman. No one contests the beauty of the woman named Helen. However, some may question the character of this immortal beauty within the text of Homer’s epic poem. Was Helen a deceitful, scheming woman, a victim of circumstance, or was she simply at the mercy of the Gods? Who was the woman who, as Christopher Marlowe stated, was “the face that launched a thousand ships”?
The motivations behind Helen’s words and actions have been analyzed throughout the years. In one example F. J. Groten, Jr., author of the article Homer’s Helen, clearly viewed Helen as a victim. This view is validated within the poem The Iliad beginning with the speech of Nestor. At this moment, the Greeks are feeling defeated and tired of war and are readying themselves for the journey home. Nestor encourages the men that they should continue their fight and that the treatment of the Trojan women should be like the miseries that Helen has had to suffer. This statement certainly implies that the Greeks feel that Helen was captured against her will. (Homer)
Groten uses many of The Iliad’s verses to show Helen’s plight. He states that she is “clearly distressed by all the misery for which she considers herself responsible”. (Groten) Groten’s proof for his explanations of Helen’s emotions is in the making of the tapestry, in which she is creating a piece of art depicting the Greeks and Trojans in battle. Helen’s last appearance in The Iliad is at Hector’s funeral, saying “In all wide Troy who will pity me or be my friend. Everyone shudders at me.” (Homer) Her words of lament and regret are moving as she weeps for Hector. As Groten explains, Homer gives Helen the important role of saying the last rites over Hector’s body.
To describe Helen’s attributes Groten often used words such as...

Find Another Essay On Varying Interpretations of Helen

Essay on Social Conventions in Jane Eyre and Hedda Gabler

2226 words - 9 pages learns not think too much of human love. Helen also advises "If all the world hated you, and believed you wicked, while your own conscience approved you, and absolved you from guilt, you would not be without friends" (Jane Eyre p. 72).       At Lowood Jane also learns she can be judged by her own merits. Mr. Brocklehurst, the administrator, announced to the entire school that by her Aunt Reed's assessment, Jane is a liar. The superintendent, Miss

Explore the ways Guterson presents women characters within the novel 'Snow Falling on Cedars'

1003 words - 4 pages they should live without restraints from society. Guterson uses these two interpretations on life to show the ongoing struggle against society's prejudices and also how Hatsue is torn between the differing values of the most important people in her life.Etta Heine is racially prejudiced. She is convinced that Kabuo killed her son and this is based on his race. She says how "we're enemies all right. They've been botherin' us over those seven acres

Revolutionary Movements in Russia

904 words - 4 pages where and how Russia would move to advance reform. Marxism and all its varying interpretations among the intelligentsia further proved that Russia still had no clear direction of how it would better itself. The primary views that began to move Russia towards the socialist path were seen in the Menshevik and Bolshevik ideologies. This split over how fast Russia would advance the proletarian revolution signaled, yet again, the shaky path Russia had been on for over the past sixty years. Ultimately, the Bolsheviks seized the initiative during the October revolution of 1917 and destined Russia a new path throughout the remainder of the twentieth century.

Physical & Emotional Abuse in Jane Eyre: How This Affected Jane’s Evolution Into a Dynamic Character

1608 words - 6 pages . She is a complex character overall but it is only because of the emotional and physical abuse she went through as a child that allowed her to become a dynamic character. The three events that mark Jane as an evolving dynamic character are when she is locked in the red room, self reflecting on her time at Gateshead, her friendship with Helen Burns at LoWood, her relationship with Mr. Rochester, and her last moments with a sick Mrs. Reed. Brought

The Meaning of the Anu Motto

774 words - 3 pages the ANU motto, "Naturam Primum Cognoscere Rerum", carries deep, philosophical derivation, and several varying interpretations of the ANU's translation exist. Its origins lie in the epic poem "De Rerum Natura", written by Lucretius, Roman poet, philosopher and scientist. Despite the ANU taking the translation of the Latin version to English as being "First to know the nature of things", this has differing interpretations, although similar, with a

Futile Search for Identity in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

1919 words - 8 pages of how others treat her, however, she truly is being an immature child, and must really learn to swallow her pride for the benefit of herself.   Due to the loss of Helen Burns, Jane is affected so that she cannot trust herself to get close to anyone and therefore is incapable of keeping a close relationship with Mr. Rochester. Jane's entire childhood is filled with abuse, and a form of abandonment. Jane endures abandonment as a

Chaos and Macbeth. A Tale of Two Theories

718 words - 3 pages , which therefore makes him responsible for his own actions and inevitable downfall. It must be remembered that Macbethis a literary work of art, and as a peice of art is open to many different interpretations, none of them right and none of them wrong. But the text of the play seems to imply that Macbeth is indeed responsible for his own actions which are provoked by an unwillingness to listen to his own conscience, the witches, and his

Gifted Children

603 words - 2 pages One of the most challenging types of student is the gifted or talented child. The gifted child is extremely bright; quickly grasping ideas and concepts you are teaching and making interpretations or extrapolations that you may not even have considered. Gifted children may also have a creativity that shows itself in original thinking or artistic creations. Students who are gifted or talented are sometimes overlooked when educators talk about

The Colonization of Mi'kmaw Memory and History 1749-1928 The King V. Gabriel Sylliboy: A Critical Review

1436 words - 6 pages petitions and the testimonies that Wicken presents a genesis of interpretations of the 1752 Treaty. Through the use of demographic data and secondary sources such as journal articles and books reflecting on this time period Wicken also illustrates the context and experiences, which may have influenced these petitions and interpretations of the 1752 Treaty. The first section entitled “Why the men testified,” provides an overview of colonial

Kemetic Orthodoxy

744 words - 3 pages themselves as part of nature, and consequently, as gods and goddesses with power (Krogh)." This statement was taken from Helen Berger, professor at West Chester University of Pennsylvania, who did her research between the 1980's thru the 1990's. What is not stated is the difference between Gardnerian Wicca and Wicca in the United States. Gardnerian Wicca is European in nature, since it started and is still maintained in England. Wicca in the

The Second Amendment of the Constitution

503 words - 2 pages explicitly and perpetually guaranteed the American individual the right to keep and bear arms. An incomparably crucial element of this country‘s origins, the Second Amendment and the rights it guarantees have proved vital to the growth and success of our nation.      The Second Amendment has often been the subject of debate, and over the years varying speculations and interpretations of its intended meaning have forced

Similar Essays

The Varying Interpretations Of Helen Essay

1325 words - 6 pages was a victim of objectification (Homer). Groten and Roisman appeared to agree on the caliber of women they felt that Helen was, however, Ryan did not. The simple explanation of these differing mindsets is the fact that Ryan, Groten, and Roisman all have differing translations of The Iliad. Perhaps the Helen that people see is solely based on the rendering of Homer’s Poem. The translations of the poem are the only qualification for varying

Varying Interpretations Of Heart Of Darkness And Apocalypse Now

2657 words - 11 pages Varying Interpretations of Heart of Darkness and Apocalypse Now     The true meaning of varying interpretations comes alive when one compares the two film versions of Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad. Heart of Darkness and Apocalypse Now have the same basic outline and underlying themes, however the plots, characters, settings, time, purposes, and points of view differ enough to create two extremely different effects and two entirely

The Story Of My Life By Helen

655 words - 3 pages believe she portrays helped her to begin to live.These lessons were taught to Helen at every available opportunity. During walks in nature, in every story Ms. Sullivan lovingly spelled, every occasion to enrich Helens mind was seized. Each concept contributed to wealth of information and insight she possessed. Ms. Keller?s deftly woven tales of discovering a flower bloom, her rich interpretations of experiencing new literature, or her vivid use

"There Are As Many Different Ways Of Interpreting And Valuing Texts As There Are Readers." Do You Agree? (Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre")

1117 words - 4 pages Clearly, every individual reader perceives a text in a different way; it is the result of our different upbringings and our different social, cultural and moral choices. From a mathematical viewpoint, if a single reader is able to draw two different sets of meanings from a text, then there are more unique interpretations of the text than there are readers. Charlotte Bronte's 19th century masterpiece, "Jane Eyre", is a useful textual example to