Why Did It Take So Long For The Vietnamese Veterans To Be Recognized In Australia?

661 words - 3 pages

When the Vietnam soldiers returned from war, they did not receive a warm and friendly welcome. They were targeted by anti-war protesters as being the enemy. They claimed that they were evil and wrong to fight in a war, which they thought was useless, and none of Australia's business. They thought that all Australia was doing was following America into war. The public all witnessed the daily footage of the war, horrible images of dead women and children, homes being destroyed and the battles themselves. Soldiers were spat on, criticized and rejected."We often felt betrayed by Australian society which questioned out sacrifice and actions. The lack of public welcome and recognition on our return added to this sense of betrayal."The veterans always felt that extremists went out of the way to make life hard for them. They felt a 'dark cloud of rejection' by both the public and the government.But why did the public harass the returning soldiers so much? In previous wars soldiers had major parades and were considered heroes by all. What made Vietnam so different? There are some notable differences between the two. In both the First World War and the Second, there was a definite and major enemy and threat, like Hitler. You could see the threat and evidence that his regime had to be stopped, but with Vietnam there was only a slight chance that it could affect Australia itself. The Vietnamese Communists never attacked Australia, not like Japanese threats and bombings in WWII.Conscription also had a major effect on this issue. People felt that the men were being sent against their will and had no intention of signing up voluntarily like in previous wars. Another factor was that the soldiers were sent in regiments, not as a whole, there was no sense of coming together for a known enemy.Not only was the veterans criticized by the public, but also the past war heroes of WWI and WWII. This to them was more...

Find Another Essay On Why did it take so long for the Vietnamese Veterans to be recognized in Australia?

How and why did the apartheid system come into existence in South Africa and how was its existence maintained and enforced for so long?

1609 words - 6 pages . It started way back during European settlement, and was enforced and maintained right up until the end of the 20th Century. It will forever leave a mark on South Africa and indeed the world; a dark period in human history from which we have and will continue to learn.Tensions between Europeans and native Africans have existed since the first days of settlement and the earliest signs of what would snowball to become apartheid can be traced to

Research Paper on "The Red Badge of Courage" by Stephen Crane and why it has been famous for so long

1499 words - 6 pages a man, he must realize that his enemy is determined to kill him. He must decide that it is better to be killing, than to be getting killed. This is all in a days work when one is at war, and this realistic fact is what Crane captures so artistically through his use of an impressionistic writing style.Crane attempted in words what the French impressionalists were striving for in color. "Impressionists tried to paint what they saw without adding

Why Did People React So Strongly to Witchcraft in History?

1809 words - 7 pages Why Did People React So Strongly to Witchcraft in History? Throughout history, people’s reactions to witchcraft have started mass panic, hysteria, disturbing witch trials, and countless executions and hangings. Witchcraft was once and still can be a very controversial topic, as it challenges other’s religions and beliefs and is against Christianity. Back when the Church was the main source of authority and guidance, reactions to witchcraft

Why did Liberalism exercise so little influence in Russia in the period 1856 to 1956?

999 words - 4 pages There are three main reasons why Liberalism did not take root in the period. Firstly the nature of Russia itself was unsuited to Liberalism's development. Secondly war often caused extremes that Liberal government wasn't capable of handling and lastly the personalities that ruled and had major influence in Russia chose an authoritarian route.Due to the way Russia was and is to this day, to rule Russia efficiently seems to require authoritarian

Australia in the Vietnam War (1965-1972) “There was overwhelming support for Australia’s involvement in the Vietnam War (1965 to 1972).” Why did Australia become involved in the war? What were the...

1884 words - 8 pages that, due to the strong alliances they had with the US, and also because of the strong friendship that the two nations had formed, Australian troops should be sent to South Vietnam to fight in this war in order to assist the US. Due to the military weakness in Australia, it was in their best interest for the US to become committed to Asia and to fight against communism in this country, as Britain began to pull out of its commitments throughout the

Why Did Australia Go To WWI?

510 words - 2 pages On the 4th August 1914, England declared war on Germany, and Australia was drawn into the war because she was a member of the British Commonwealth. The attitude of the Australian Government was that we would defend Britain “to the last man, and to the last farthing,” (This was spoken by the future Prime Minister Andrew Fisher). Australians rallied to the cause with over 52 000 volunteers in 1914. The reasons for volunteering

"Why was the civil war so long and so bloody?"

1579 words - 6 pages their win. So, although the Union had the power in the sea as an advantage and were fairly efficient at advancing forward, it did take time for them to achieve its goals.With so many battles taking place which did not make much difference to the outcome of the war, and so many lives being lost as well it lead to the civil war being one of the longest and bloodiest in America's history.

Why Did Australia Join The Vietnam War?

424 words - 2 pages (which was battling against its communist North Vietnamese neighbours). This also meant that communism was stopped in Vietnam and would stop moving south, making Australia safe. Robert Menzies told Australians that if South Vietnam was taken over it would be a direct military threat to Australia and that South Vietnam had asked for Australia's help. But South Vietnam did not ask for Australia's help until after the government requested South

Why was the battle for Kokoda Track so significant for Australia?

4597 words - 18 pages , resulting in one-page access for a matching row on an equal predicate.The alternative approach to the software DB2 10 is that it will be used as a new set of stored procedures and catalog tables to determine what statistics need to be collected and when. With Remington Peckinpaw Davis this approach will also assist them in recording what activities are being performed and will be able to do it all via an automatic scheduling process.Xerox likes

Why Was China Such an Advanced Society for So Long?

2485 words - 10 pages Why Was China Such an Advanced Society for So Long? Throughout history, China has been the center of many developments allowing for it to establish itself as an advanced society, one that has lasted through a number of dynastic cycles, an attempt towards the creation of a Republic, and still existing, People’s Republic of China, under the rule of China’s Communist party. Throughout this turbulent history China has made much advancement in site

Discuss the reasons for European overseas exploration and enterprise in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Why did they take place when and where they did?

554 words - 2 pages been experiencing a shortage of silver and had no prospect for a new source. They new that great amounts of gold existed in Africa, but were not happy with the present system in which they bought gold from Arabs in Northern Africa. The gold went through several middlemen before reaching the Arabs. Like any business, every time the gold changed hands, the price increased. They strove to find the source of the gold so that they could purchase it less

Similar Essays

Why Did It Take So Long For The Nations Of Europe To Defeat Napoleon I?

772 words - 3 pages brought back to power. But once again he was being tackled on all frontiers by the Allies and inevitably the whole dispute came to one final decisive battle: Waterloo.Napoleon was crushed in his final battle and forced into exile in the distant island of Saint Helena, where he would be supervised by British guards and would pose no threat to the peace and order of mainland Europe.It took this long for the Allies to finally defeat and get rid of

Why Did It Take So Much Longer For Women To Get The Vote?

904 words - 4 pages . The drive is described to be ‘long and winding’. The use of long vowel sounds within the words ‘long’ and ‘winding’ lengthen the journey to the prison to allow the characters to dwell on Joe and the hunger strike. The ‘roads had a thoughtful quietness’ this use of a short sentence portrays little to no traffic on the road. This also allows the characters to focus on the prison visit. This opening sentence for the passage allows the reader to

Thank You... Rememberance Day In Canada, Why We Are Thankful For What The Soldiers Did For Us So Long Ago

780 words - 4 pages Thank YouMost teens in Canada take their freedom for granted. We have always had freedom, and have never even really had our freedom threatened. All of us know that wars have been fought, and that Canadians took part. However, what many of us do not understand is that many Canadians were killed in order to protect the future of our country and the world. Just because the war did not take place on Canadian ground does not mean that Canada was not

Why The Germans Lost And Why It Took The Allies So Long To Win

1307 words - 5 pages Why the Germans Lost and why It took the Allies so Long to winThe World War II began with Germany's attack on Poland in 1939 and ended with the attack on Japan's Hiroshima in 1945 with the atomic bomb. A number of battles were fought during these six years which led to success of the Allies and defeat of the Axis Powers. There are a number of causes of Germany's defeat in the World War II. Among these causes are some of very wrong decisions of