Why Did The Usa Get Involved In Vietnam In The 1950's And 1960's?

871 words - 3 pages

There was many reasons for the USA to get involved in Vietnam between the 1950's and 60's however they were all in stages, not just in one go. They called America and USA'S 'clash' the "Cold War" which began mainly due to America and the USSR'S political differences. The USSR was a communist state and the USA and the other countries who were their partners were capalist states or countries. Many people believed that capalists and communists could not live alongside each other for long and that one system would take over another, however both sides were determined not to be taken over. This is how it all started as the governments were trying to take over large parts of East Europe and Asia. When the buffer zones were added there was a greater risk of war as the zones were dominated by the USSR who were causing a government domino effect through to the west so the USA and their partners were determined to stop it which caused the Truman Doctrine.The main reasons for the USA to get involved with Vietnam were because of their fear of communism and that communism could take over the Western world and Asia. Another reason why the USA didn't like communism was because in 1945 the USA built and tested the first nuclear bomb on Japan but kept it secret from the Russians even though they were supposed to be allies. This made the Russians very suspicious of America. America also didn't like communism because of their very different political beliefs as the communists were a totalitarian state whilst the USA believed in democracy and were afraid the Russians would try to spread their beliefs around the world.The first way of the USA to get involved was to supply France with money as during World War 2 they had lost control of North Vietnam however managed to keep control of South Vietnam. The USA paid the French armies to regain control of North Vietnam so to keep it capitalist and was thought to be a stand against world wide spread of communism. However in 1949 Americans were worried because China had turned communist and supplied money and weapons to North Vietnam making the war harder to win. The French assumed that they were invincible as they were surrounded by mountains and an airbase but the French miscalculation led to a humiliating defeat and ended French plans to regain control of Vietnam. This meant the USA had to get more involved as well as take more action as communism continued to get stronger. The USA's next involvement plan was to send military...

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