William Shakespaeare And The Duality Essay

1484 words - 6 pages

Past cultures often showed the dualities of humanity in their stories, their scriptures, and their deities; they all expressed the good and the evil sides of humans. By reading and analyzing these literary works, one can start to understand the true intentions of humanity. William Shakespeare, an English playwright, understood these characteristics that all humans possess, and used his plays show this understanding to the audiences. Shakespeare used the characters of his plays, and their actions to represent the dual human nature of good and evil.
Naturally, human beings are very opportunistic. If humans are faced with a situation that will benefit them, then they will usually take advantage of that situation. In times like this, humans often put aside potential consequences, meaning that the intentional or unintentional destruction of lives, homes, and surroundings do not alter their intentions. This follows accordingly with the Incentive Theory of Motivation which suggests that humans are pulled into action by outside incentives. "Building on the base established by drive theories, incentive theories emerged in the 1940s and 1950s. Incentive theories proposed that behavior is motivated by the "pull" of external goals, such as rewards, money, or recognition." (Hockenbury & Hockenbury, 2003). In William Shakespeare’s plays, he exemplifies the Theory of Motivation in Macbeth’s rise to power, showing that even the most noble can succumb to the temptations of evil. Celebrated for his loyalty and accomplishments under King Duncan, Macbeth initially represented the noble, good nature of humanity. After learning of Macbeth’s victory over Macdonwald, a sergeant of the King’s army referred to him as “brave Macbeth”, and then said “he deserves that name” (1.2.18). The gratitude and praise of Macbeth continued when the King himself referred to Macbeth as his “valiant cousin”, and as a “worthy gentleman”; these words of acclaim further in grain the idea that Macbeth showed the character of a great hero (1.2.26). Macbeth’s nobility and honor, however, soon became challenged by apparitions that appear unearthly--witches that represent the dark side that humans possess. This darkness can corrupt the mind and persuade its owner to perform deeds outside of their normal character. Shakespeare understood that all humans have evil inside and he chose to represent this evil by the witches. The witches planted the idea of kingship in Macbeth when they revealed to him the prophecy. The witches spoke of his rise to power as thane of Cawdor, and then of his rise as King of Scotland.They understood that the King still lived but they persisted on telling Macbeth his future--the sisters planted evil into Macbeth’s mind, and slowly changed a noble lord to a murderous villain.
Negative energy sends a direct command to the subconscious mind targeting the instinct and desire centre. According to the Spiritual Science Research Foundation, if a person resists a desire, then...

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